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Which Oscar Nominee's Fans Have the Best Grammar?

Oscars 2016: Study on Grammar of Fans
Leonardo DiCaprio
Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty

02/22/2016 AT 11:15 AM EST

Come Feb. 28, Hollywood's brightest talents will be competing for one of those coveted Oscar statuettes.

But the awards for best fan grammar are already here – and they don't quite align with our Oscar predictions.

A study from Grammarly analyzed movies reviews and IMdb comments, and determined which films and actors have the least amount of errors in their posts – plus, the words they use the most.

When it comes to Best Picture nominees, it's Brooklyn reviewers who are the most grammatically correct, with just 2.3 mistakes per every 100 words. Fans of frontrunner The Revenant come in second place, with 2.5 mistakes. Rounding out the top three is The Big Short, with 2.6 mistakes per 100 words.



Things start to fall from there: in fourth place is Spotlight, which has 3.2 mistakes per 100 words. The reviews with the worst grammar are those of Bridge of Spies, with 3.9 mistakes.

As for what they're tweeting about, some of the words are obvious: performance pops up as a favorite in nearly every tweet.

But some are less expected: While Jacob Tremblay is garnering a lot of the attention in Room, ironically, his costar (and Oscar frontrunner) Brie Larson's name doesn't appear in the top three most frequently used words in reviews. Same with The Revenant's Leonardo DiCaprio, who may be likely to receive the Best Actor trophy, but fails to work his way into the top three most frequently said words in reviews, while his costar Tom Hardy does.

When looking at IMdb comments on the pages of the acting nominees, there are a few surprises, too. Of course, everyone is quick to call Leonardo DiCaprio "amazing," with that word landing in his top three most frequently said terms … but "desperate" ranks up there, too. His BFF, fellow nominee Kate Winslet, fares a little better: Her words are "talented," "versatile" and "legend."

Then, of course, are the responses that make us shake our heads. Nominees Sylvester Stallone and Charlotte Rampling are the same age, but "aging" only appears in her top three words – while he gets "iconic."

However, if it's any consolation, when people talk about Rampling, they have the least amount of errors – just 3.9 per 100 words. On the other hand, Stallone fans rank at the bottom of the list, making 8.9 mistakes per 100 words. Keep reading to see more grammatical goodness:

Academy Awards Grammar
 Study Infographic
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