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Why Padma Lakshmi Is Still Storing Her Frozen Eggs – and Why She Ate Her Placenta After Her Daughter's Birth

03/09/2016 AT 11:45 AM EST

In Padma Lakshmi's new memoir, Love, Loss, And What We Ate, excerpted in this week's PEOPLE, the star reveals she ate her placenta after the birth of her daughter Krishna in 2010.

Worried about regaining her strength after giving birth, she decided to consume her placenta in pill form. The primary benefit, she writes, "was warding off post-partum depression, something I feared more than fatigue. And I had bouts of depression myself at various times in my life."

Why Padma Lakshmi Is Still Storing Her Frozen Eggs – and Why She Ate Her Placenta After Her Daughter's Birth| Babies, Top Chef, Books, People Picks, Padma Lakshmi

Padma Lakshmi

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Watch more of The Jess Cagle Interview with Padma Lakshmi on People.com all week.

Still, she admits, "The idea of it still bugged me. I'm not gonna lie."



After Krishna's birth, her close friend (and acupuncturist) took the placenta from the hospital, placed it in a refrigerator, and along with Lakshmi's assistant, went to Kmart to buy all new kitchen appliances for the process, which resulted in powdered placenta which was then put into gelatin caps.

Lakshmi didn't tell anyone for many months, but writes, "I would have done anything to defend myself against collapsing from stress and fatigue and succumbing to the post-partum depression I was so afraid would beset me."

Today, she is proud of her decision and and hopes others will learn about the benefits.

Why Padma Lakshmi Is Still Storing Her Frozen Eggs – and Why She Ate Her Placenta After Her Daughter's Birth| Babies, Top Chef, Books, People Picks, Padma Lakshmi

Nancy Reagan on the cover of PEOPLE



Lakshmi also reveals that in her late thirties, her doctor told her it would be nearly impossible to have children "the old fashioned way" due to her severe endometriosis. So she froze three of her eggs.

"I had all these surgeries and I had my right fallopian tube removed and part of my left ovary removed," she says. "I know technically how I got pregnant, but there's basically tin foil and rabbit ears holding it all together in there so I was concerned. I wasn't in a relationship that was steady or that I felt was established enough to think about having children, so I remember Teddy [Forstmann] saying, 'Why not just fertilize them and let's go,' and my refrain constantly was, 'Let's wait a while and see if we're still here in a year.' "

Her three eggs are still in storage. As for the possibility that she may use them someday to try for another child, she says, "I guess never say never but I'm just lucky to have [daughter] Krishna. I'm happy with that."
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