What's On This Week

SUNDAY, JUNE 17

FLIGHT OF THE CONCHORDS
10:30 P.M. | HBO
This half-hour series' curious title is the name of a band—a New Zealand folk-pop comedy team, Jemaine Clement and Bret McKenzie. Relocated to Manhattan, the duo serve up mild deadpan humor about girls, show biz, street crime and just getting by, supplemented by songs that are sweet, goofy and lilting.

THE 4400
9 P.M. | USA
Season 4 for the sci-fi drama about future mankind mucking up the present. A teen dork goes messianic, then shifty Billy Campbell (right, with Summer Glau) steps in.

MONDAY, JUNE 18

NEW SEASON!

THE CLOSER
9 P.M. | TNT
Oh, good. Kyra Sedgwick is back for a third season as detective Brenda Johnson, she of the sweet southern twang and the insistently irascible intelligence. If only she could have adopted Veronica Mars! The murder cases usually aren't the real heart of this series—Johnson's ups and downs with her colleagues (and lovers) count for more—but this first new episode has a couple of sharp, entertaining twists.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20

AFI'S 100 YEARS ... 100 MOVIES
8 P.M. | CBS
The American Film Institute reveals a new list of top, top films. Perhaps it will include the obscure indie gem shown at right.

LIL' BUSH
10:30 P.M. | COMEDY CENTRAL
Aw! A satiric cartoon that infantilizes George Bush and his advisers. Still, not as subversive as the channel's previous GWB satire, That's My Bush!

Age of Love
NBC, Mondays, 9 p.m. (ET) | [3 stars]
REALITY

Australian tennis star Mark Philippoussis, 30, tries to narrow down his romantic prospects from a group of attractively seasoned women who are mostly north of 40 and a second, more provocatively luscious group south of 30. Isn't the sexual-biological imperative cruel? Philippoussis tends to furrow his brow in thought and surprise, although that may be from a life scrutinizing the baseline. The show is fun, but would be improved if Nora Ephron provided commentary.

Heartland
TNT, Mondays, 10 p.m. (ET) | [2 stars]
DRAMA

Treat Williams plays the newly appointed head of an organ-transplant facility where his soon-to-be-ex-wife (Kari Matchett) happens to be the one who's in charge of lining up donors. The declining but not yet flatlining EKG of their relationship is captured very nicely by Williams and Matchett, both giving strong, stoic performances. Everything else is too quiet, though. Instead of pumping up the medical crises, the show gives the surgeon little fantasies in which he encounters the dead donors. These are meant to be spiritually meaningful moments, but they come across as unhinged.

Meadowlands
Showtime, Sundays, 10 p.m. (ET) | [1.5 stars]
DRAMA

This British import is about the newest family in a dully pristine suburb built on a perverse secret. Danny Brogan (David Morrissey) has been relocated here as part of a witness protection program—but soon learns that all the neighbors are in the program. And they're a bad bunch. (During a soccer game, the local constable viciously stomps on a man's face.) Lucy Cohu, as the unhappy but darkly sexy Mrs. Brogan, is striking, but the show's tone of enigmatic menace is overcooked. If anyone ever asks about a home equity loan, they'll probably be killed.