Coming into Your Own ... Whenever
THE LATE BLOOMER'S REVOLUTION
by Amy Cohen |

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REVIEWED BY DANIELLE TRUSSONI

MEMOIR

Amy Cohen always imagined that one day she would be living her ideal life, one that included the following ingredients: a perfect marriage, a few kids, a successful career and a swanky Manhattan loft. Yet at 35, Cohen found herself in another place entirely: Her mother had died, leaving her emotionally fragile; she had broken up with the man she hoped to marry; she was fired from her glitzy TV writing job; and she lived in a tiny, dark apartment—with mice. As she watched her newly single father venture, with great success, into the world of dating (while she spent her Saturday nights at home), Cohen became besieged by dreams of the life that had never quite materialized.

Rather than bemoan her missed opportunities, the author designated herself a late bloomer, "someone who discovers his or her strengths later than expected." The result is this charming book, an addictive journey through dating and loss that remains stubbornly hope-filled. Taking inspiration from late bloomers including Lucille Ball (who was 40 when I Love Lucy hit the air) and Colonel Sanders (who founded KFC at 62), Revolution is a warm, hilarious memoir that reminds us it's never too late to begin.

The Master Bedroom
by Tessa Hadley |

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REVIEWED BY EMILY CHENOWETH

CRITIC'S CHOICE

NOVEL

In Hadley's elegantly observed third novel, London academic Kate Flynn returns to her Welsh hometown to care for her aging mother, only to find herself entangled in a web of new temptations. On the verge of a midlife crisis, Kate finds herself attracted to old friend David Roberts, who's trapped in a failing marriage. Complicating things: Kate's other admirer is David's son Jamie, 17. Hadley's smart, often prickly characters remind us that love is never simple, and happiness rarely wins without sorrow.