From PEOPLE Magazine Click to enlarge
In New Jack City, his was the face of ruthless criminality, not to mention joyful megalomania. But the man who made Harlem drug lord Nino Brown so deliriously despicable is hard to peg. He was also the intensely competitive saxophonist in Spike Lee's Mo' Better Blues. And in Lee's latest, Jungle Fever, Snipes plays a sensitive architect involved in an extramarital and interracial love affair with Annabella Sciorra. What unifies these charismatic characters is the New Yorker's underlying aura. "I think of myself as a young prince from a long line of royalty. My sign is Leo. A Leo has to walk with pride. When he takes a step, he has to put his foot down. You walk into a room and you want people to know your presence, without you doing anything. I think I have kind of a natural magnetism. I don't see myself as extremely handsome. I just figure I can charm you into liking me." The eldest of six children, Snipes grew up in the Bronx and. as a martial arts-obsessed teenager, returned with his family to live in Orlando, his birthplace. Unattached, he is the doting father of a 2-year-old boy, Jelani. He doesn't plan to remain single, though. "I've got to do something about that," he says. And he knows what sort of woman he is looking for: "the well-proportioned athletic type...sensuous and sophisticated all at the same time [with] a real sense of her power, her womanliness." One paradigm: Madge Sinclair, who played nurse Ernestine Shoop on Trapper John, M.D. "When I watch her move-it's, like, beautiful, man.' "