Telling where it hurt
During the past ten years, when Dr. Anthony Pisani talked about bones, as he did here so knowledgeably with New York Giant center Greg Larson, the players all listened. So, apparently, did some other interested parties. Pisani was the team's orthopedic surgeon, ministering to the sprains and fractures that make football the chancy business it is. But a New York grand jury said that the doctor had been passing bits of information about the players' well-being to a pair of bookies who were indicted on 40 counts of conspiracy and gambling. Although Dr. Pisani, who retired recently from the team, was not held criminally responsible, football officials were nonetheless aghast. League rules stated clearly that the good doctor, like other members of the team, was not to get within sneezing distance of any gamblers.

Royalty on the rocks
It started out as a jaunty cruise to catch a breeze on a hot Massachusetts day. But for the 85 passengers aboard the Vineyard Queen, such plans were quickly to go awry, not to mention aground. While still inside Boston harbor, the vessel hit a tiny island—which ripped a hole in the hull. Rescue boats arrived to bring the passengers back to land, and their appearance was none too soon. When another vessel, the Nantascot, moved in to help the ailing Vineyard, she, too, hit a shallow spot and was similarly stuck.

An IRA revenge
Covered with tar and feathers, lashed to a postbox in Belfast, this 17-year-old boy was the victim of some frontier justice handed down by self-styled lawmen of the Irish Republican Army. He was accused of the rape of a 14-year-old girl, an act he eventually confessed. To add humiliation to his punishment, he was put "on display" in his own neighborhood in broad daylight and draped with a sign indicating his crime. Later, the IRA said its punishment of the boy, who required hospital treatment, was "mild," mitigated only because of his plea that he had been drunk at the time of the offense.