Water hazard
Surveying his Newport Beach, Calif. office, Don DeMars knew he had received one of two things: either a disposable water bed or a painstakingly thorough practical joke. There on his spotless carpet were 2,000 paper cups, carefully stapled together (by two office pranksters) and brimming with water. To dislodge one, DeMars quickly noted, was to prove the domino theory. The kitchen baster in his hand proved hardly up to the job. Finally, the fire department came to the rescue with a water vacuum. DeMars is plotting revenge.

A grocery goodbye
In Mount Lebanon, Pa. the small grocery run by Jim and Peggy McKeen has been a spot where shoppers could get a quart of milk and the local gossip all in one stop. Last month the news was all bad: the economy is off, and supermarkets are forcing mom-and-pop outlets like the McKeens out of business. The two put up a sign thanking their neighbors for past patronage—and then, as Peggy wept, shut their doors after 22 years in business.

A legal chewing out
Confronted with a traffic ticket, most motorists suppress—just barely—an urge to tear it up. Two-year-old Mairi Coleman went them one better: When her mother, Flora, of Virginia Beach got a summons for running a red light, Mairi thoughtfully ate it. Prepared to take their medicine, figuratively if not literally, Mairi and her mom approached the bar of justice. Happily, neither of the two had to cough up anything. A sympathetic judge dismissed the case.

Pretrial motions
On TV it looks easy—one cop advises the arrestee of his rights while the other frisks him and slips on the cuffs. In Wood, Wis. federal guards at the Veterans Administration Center discovered it's somewhat tougher without a script. When disgruntled veterans demonstrated at the center recently, a total of 11 arrests were made, including the one pictured above. Faced with what seemed to be an immovable objector, four officers teamed up to provide an irresistible force—not to mention a somewhat graceless human pyramid.

Cadillac arrest
The culprit who knocked down some street signs and then drove through Jesse Harvey's fence and into her yard in Houston, Tex. isn't likely to get away unscolded. By the time the 77-year-old Mrs. Harvey came out of her house to see what the noise was, the driver of the 1972 Cadillac had fled. Undaunted, Mrs. Harvey chained the car to a tree. Until the driver surrenders and pays the damages, she vows, the car will stay right there.