Her cup runneth under
When 8-year-old Nancy Winnard, an in-fielder for a Romulus, Mich. Little League team, refused to wear an athletic supporter, she was benched. All players had to wear cups, said league officials. So next time out Nancy wore a toy teacup around her neck. The ump, a stickler for the rules, promptly ordered her off the field. "I view this cup rule as a violation of my daughter's constitutional rights," said Nancy's father, David, who has hired a lawyer to fight the case. "Besides, it's just plain stupid."

Out on a ledge
Just before British Chancellor of the Exchequer Denis Healey set off to present his budget to Parliament, police spotted a suspicious package on a window ledge opposite his home. Fearing a bomb, Constable Michael Kearns climbed a ladder to investigate—politely. He was greeted by startled office workers who opened the window and said that the package contained eggs, peas and grapefruit. "All the girls use the ledge as a sort of fridge," was the cheerful explanation.

Giving up the reins
It seemed like an unfair disadvantage for driver Kevin Newbound. The other men were zipping along behind trotters while he was relying on shank's mare. What happened was that Newbound was piloting Sengren Suru, a 2-year-old, around the home turn in Melbourne, Australia when he was thrown from his sulky. Newbound thereupon discovered what politicians have known in a different context for years: it's difficult to give up the reins.

A frail Hutton
Lately, Barbara Hutton, 62, has not been in the best of health. When she arrived in Paris recently from New York, the long plane ride was just too much for her—jet lag and all that. By the time she reached her hotel, Miss Hutton couldn't even muster up the strength to walk. Not to worry. Her faithful chauffeur picked up the frail Woolworth heiress and carried her over the threshold.

Mary proves her point
Stunt woman Mary Connors' specialty is playing human cannonball. But her usual costume, a heavily padded pair of overalls, had provoked some speculation that she really is a man in disguise. To set the record straight, plucky Mary climbed into a big gun clad only in her bra, panties and crash helmet. The resulting journey across the British landscape proved her point: en route, Mary lost her bra. "It was a very powerful argument," said one witness.