A Day at the Races
As if Princess Margaret's erstwhile hippie escort Roddy Llewellyn weren't déclassé enough, her latest swain, antiques dealer Ned Ryan, has already also begun to curdle bluebloods. Accompanying the princess to the royal enclosure at Ascot, Ryan, who's dubbed "P.M.'s jester" because of his merry pranks, suddenly sloshed a glass of champagne over Tessa Dahl, Patricia Neal's 19-year-old actress daughter. Tessa retaliated by heaving an ice bucket. Ryan ducked, and the bucket plopped in the laps of an elderly baronet and his wife. The authorities were notified.

Lip Sink
If Lon Chaney was the man of a thousand faces, then Oliver Reed is the man of a thousand feuds. The British actor's been having at Richard Harris for years, and he's been at daggers with Raquel Welch since The Three Musketeers (when he ungallantly muttered out loud, "I'd sooner sleep with her hairdresser"). As fate would have it, Welch has been cast as Reed's wife in an upcoming version of The Prince and the Pauper. Oliver so dreads a scripted smooch scene that, he jokes, "I cabled Harris and asked whether he wanted to be my stand-in—with his toupee and her falsies, they're made for each other." In any case, Reed is girding himself for what "will probably be the longest-ever kiss, because she won't be able to take her teeth out of my lower lip."

Mother Courage
"Most people want to be secure—I have a need to be unsettled. Mothers have instincts about these things. Mine keeps telling me to stop wasting my life. To a mother's eyes, a man remains a baby until the day she dies. So she looks at my life, and she worries. She says I was trained for other things—I majored in psychology. I'm an educator, a teacher. But I say, 'Ma, how do I get off the mountain? The mountain is so high. How do I get off the merry-go-round? The merry-go-round is so fast.' " Who loves ya, baby? It's Telly's Mom, Christina Kapsallis Savalas.

The Wildest
Child From Baby LeRoy to Tatum O'Neal, Hollywood has encouraged a pestilence of enfants terribles. Perhaps none has been as outrageous as 5-year-old Harvey Stevens, who portrays the monstrous Antichrist son of Gregory Peck and Lee Remick in the latest supernatural chiller, The Omen. "On the first day of shooting," producer Harvey Bernhard reports, Stevens "came up to director Dick Donner, hit him and split his lip. Then he butted into the cameraman and knocked him down. He was a tiger during the entire production." And triumphant completion of the role didn't exactly mellow little Harvey: within hours of returning to civilian classes, his parents were notified that Stevens had beat up on a schoolmate.

Furthermore

•If his The FBI series were still shooting, might TV G-man Efrem Zimbalist Jr. be investigating congressional typing pools? Lately, in introducing like-thinking conservative Ronald Reagan at a GOP state convention, Zimbalist cracked that "the Republicans had their Watergate scandal—now the Democrats have their waterbed scandal."

•As the first office building for blacks in Macon, Ga. it was a landmark. Then Capricorn Records turned the crumbling quarters into a parking lot. But sentiment prevailed, and now the site has been relandscaped as a memorial park to Capricorn's stilled stars: R&B great Otis Redding, victim of a 1967 plane crash, and Allman Brothers bandsmen Duane Allman and Berry Oakley, killed in separate motorcycle accidents.

•The symbol of making it in Hollywood is no longer being footprinted at the old Grauman's Chinese but rather being served up at a Dean Martin TV roast. Yet, curiously, Lee Majors declined the honor. His explanation: Dino's taping conflicted with the Six Million Dollar Man schedule. Another possibility: Lee feared he couldn't quite cope with the required bionic badinage.

•At a conference in Aspen, Colo., a man flapped across the stage attired only in a black scarf wrapped around his head. "I guess for men, streaking is liberation," continued the speaker, patently unrattled. "For women, it's not having to streak." The speaker: Gloria Steinem.