Marty Feldman
Ann-Margret and Marty Feldman: the beauty and the beast (PEOPLE, Aug. 29). Your cover was never more interesting.
Robert Bennet
Topeka

I saw Young Frankenstein 15 times and Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother almost 20 because of Gene Wilder and Marty Feldman. They are the best comic team since Laurel & Hardy or Abbott & Costello. I am a 27-year-old mother of two little girls and these two funny men make me feel happy! More!
A. Rhodes
Ventura, Calif.

Princess Grace may not be a heavy tipper, as you say in Chatter, but Marty Feldman is worse. Feldman recently occupied a penthouse suite, with butler service, at Hyatt on Union Square, and when we could not extend his reservations, he and his wife barricaded themselves inside the suite and stayed two more days. He had three butlers at his beck and call at all times. When he finally left, not only did he completely stiff the butlers, but he called three bellmen for his luggage and gave them a total of one dollar to "split" among them. Needless to say, Feldman, who was getting a special rate anyway, will not be welcome back here again.
Sandie Wernick
Hyatt on Union Square
San Francisco

Feldman stayed at the hotel while promoting The Last Remake of Beau Geste and was told that all room arrangements and gratuities would be taken care of by Universal Pictures' representative in San Francisco. He takes personal responsibility for all those offended, according to publicist Michael Maslansky, "particularly since the service at the hotel was among the best he and Mrs. Feldman have ever encountered."—ED.

Star Tracks
Your words on Elvis Presley were kind. Your picture was not.
Judy Kirkpatrick
Bridgeville, Pa.

Dr. John Bonica
Thank you for your article on Dr. John Bonica, founder of the pain clinic at the University of Washington. In 1974 at the age of 26, I entered the program suffering from chronic low back and right leg pain. I left Seattle nine months later able to deal with my pain. I was living for the first time in six years.

I practice the program every minute of my life, eternally grateful to the many dedicated people—particularly Dr. Connie Peck—who taught me to live without self-pity or self-doubt. I hope this letter will give those suffering the knowledge that there is help—if they want it.
Debbie Rosen
Beverly Hills

Alferd Packer
After reading your article on Alferd Packer, the cannibal, I got this gnawing urge to tell you what I thought of it. Friends of mine thought the story in bad taste. People who think like that really eat at me. I like an article with bite.
Joseph M. Kuehn
Saugus, Calif.

Helen Crabtree
Helen Crabtree may be at the top of her profession, but the "art" of gaited riding is peculiar indeed. The rider bobs up and down over the horse's kidneys instead of sitting in the normal position over the animal's center of gravity. Tendons in the tail are cut to make it stand up. The horse's feet are grown out inches beyond normal length, and that high, showy prance is often induced artificially by making the horse wear heavy weights, or rubber "bell boots," which conceal small cuts made in the skin—all for that flashy, wild-eyed look. You won't find such methods employed in hunter seat equitation.
P. K. Barnes
Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Crabtree replies: "Almost without exception every practice referred to is archaic and in any case has never applied to the breed I train, the American saddle horse. The goal is to train a happy, confident, comfortable horse—and you can't do it with cruel methods."—ED.