Dressing Down
She was two hours late for a Detroit concert, so to make amends wiggy rock star Wendy O. Williams of the Plasmatics offered her fans a little extra flash. She said she would pay $25 each to two male and two female concertgoers who would bare more than their souls to the crowd. Four volunteers showed some T&A, stripping Wendy of $100 in no time flat. Said Detroit promoter Gail Parenteau, "It was like a punk version of The Price Is Right."

High Hopes
He thought it was just another brownstone in Hoboken, N.J. when he bought it 15 years ago, but then factory worker Edwin Olivieri discovered his home had an illustrious past—Frank Sinatra had lived there as a teenager. In an enterprising spirit, Olivieri hoped to sell it at auction for a cool million or so. On auction day, however, only the press and a few onlookers showed up to eat the antipasto and hear neighbors reminisce about Young Blue Eyes. Agent (and auctioneer) Don Gordon of Century 21 opened the bidding at $150,000 and let it hang there for a full 30 seconds before giving up. The 10-room town house is still on the market. "I'd like to see the owner lower his price," sighs Gordon. "They're only asking $110,000 for the house next door."

While His Guitar Gently Weeps
"It's not news like Churchill and Dunkirk," says Gilda Radner's manager, but it's still a surprise. Bernie Brillstein confirms that his client has left her husband of 21 months, guitarist G.E. Smith, for comedian Gene Wilder. Since word of the coupling leaked out, Wilder has taken his phone off the hook. Manager Brillstein adds that Gilda's marriage was already shaky when she and Gene met two months ago to make a film called—no kidding—Hanky Panky.

Dog Days
During the filming of a TV movie, Karen Valentine (Room 222) found herself dashing off to her trailer between scenes for "a bite of cottage cheese or a cookie." How come? Well, her co-star was a dog, with a trainer off-camera. The dog, of course, got a little munchie every time he did something right, and...aha! "I was going to my trailer rewarding myself," Karen analyzes, "so as not to be treated any less well than the dog." She disciplined herself to knock off the nibbling, but then the crew got wind of it and wouldn't quit. "Every time the director said, 'That's a print,' " reports Valentine, "the assistant director would give me a piece of candy and say, That was very good. Good Karen.' "

George's Gospel
George Steinbrenner was recalling one of his first spring trainings as owner of the New York Yankees. He had issued an edict against long hair. It was challenged by outfielder Lou Piniella, who pointed out that Jesus wore his hair long and that he, Piniella, was simply emulating Christ. Steinbrenner gazed out the window as he considered Lou's argument. "See that swimming pool?" George asked Piniella. "The day you go over there and walk across it, you can wear your hair any way you want."

Furthermore

•Dudley Moore reports that his towering (6') main squeeze, Susan Anton, has just made some commercials for the Land of the Rising Sun. "She's very big in Japan," he observes. "Come to think of it," adds the diminutive (5'2") Dudley, "I'm almost very big there myself."

•Richard Dreyfuss, 34, has matured to the point where he admits, "Part of me is still waiting to grow up to be an adult, and part of me knows there's no such thing."

•In our quest to illuminate one of this country's most popular joke forms, we proffer the following: How many Republicans does it take to screw in a light bulb? Answer: Four. One to screw in the bulb and three to reminisce about how good the old one was.