Down Under and Dirty
Some folks will try anything. In an attempt to boost interest in the adolescent sex romp My Tutor, 20th Century-Fox, which is distributing the film in Australia, decided to juice up the Aussie TV ad campaign. Their ad implied that the film was so sexually explicit that it broke up a relationship between its star, Matt Lattanzi, 24, and his love, Olivia Newton-John, 35. Well, you can't get away with that kind of stuff in Livvy's homeland. Her people called Fox's people (who, by the way, are distributing her next film, Two of a Kind, with John Travolta) and the following ad appeared in Melbourne and Sydney papers: "Dear Olivia and Matt, 20th Century-Fox is pleased and proud to be distributing films you are both in. We are sorry for any embarrassment that our advertising on My Tutor may have caused. We know that you are happy together and wish you continued happiness and success in the future."

Cultural Exchange
British pop star Toyah Wilcox, 25, gets along famously with her co-star in the upcoming British TV film The Ebony Tower. And just because he's 76 and his name is Sir Laurence Olivier doesn't mean they can't be intimate. As she told the British press, "He tells me about the women in his life, including Vivien Leigh. He does wonderful impersonations for me, particularly of John Mills. I call him Sir to his face and have dinner with him at 8 p.m." As for the common ground upon which this friendship rests, Toyah confides, "We talk a lot about rock music." Oh, Lord.

Surprise Attack
Never known to be weak of heart, Lana Turner, 63, felt her ticker skip a beat when she heard herself introduced before an appearance on the new syndicated talk show Thicke of the Night. The announcer had said that Lana would appear before the rock group Jack Mack and the Heart Attack. But Lana misunderstood, thinking Jack's title referred to her. Calling for the show's talent coordinator, she said, "I'm quite distressed. I just heard them say, 'Lana Turner, just back from a heart attack.' "

Private Bar
The bar mitzvah of Bob Dylan's son, Jesse, at Jerusalem's Wailing Wall surprised more than a few folks. For one thing, at 17, the boy was a little long in the tooth for a bar mitzvah. For another, Dad booked the synagogue under his given name, Robert Zimmerman, so few caught on to the event before it happened. Even those who saw Dylan in prayer might not have recognized him in traditional Jewish garb: a prayer shawl, yarmulke and tefillin (small boxes containing scriptural passages bound to the left arm and forehead). After all, as word has it, the last time he came to Israel he was on a pilgrimage as a born-again Christian. One of the few who did recognize Dylan learned not to photograph a man in prayer—the hard way. As the tourist lifted his camera, Dylan's bodyguards covered the lens and threatened to break it. Sure, the times, they are achangin', but not that much: At 42, Dylan still hates publicity.

Furthermore

•Even while celebrating her success, Shelley Long thought of one slight problem brought on by the Emmy she received for her role as a waitress on NBC's Cheers. She doesn't know where to put the 15½"-tall trophy. "I think my fireplace is smaller than the Emmy," she said. "I'll have to get a new fireplace...I'll have to get a new house. Oh well, I needed a new house anyway."

•Željko Ivanek, the hot young actor who played Matthew Broderick's brother in Broadway's Brighton Beach Memoirs, is making life difficult for co-star Jack Lemmon in the upcoming film Mass Appeal. Says Jack, "It's easier to memorize an entire script than to pronounce his name."