Princess Caroline
Why must we be constantly bombarded with gossipy, trivia-laden articles on European royalty? I, for one, expelled a huge yawn over the news of Princess Caroline's second wedding (PEOPLE, Jan. 9). Apparently this young woman has wasted her youth on rich, frivolous playboys, but I don't see that this merits a cover story. And who cares if she is pregnant?
Bonnie Graham
Bradley Beach, N.J.

Jim Brown
Jim Brown seems bitter over the prospect of Franco Harris breaking his rushing record. Brown had a fine career, and it would be a shame for him to try a comeback and humiliate himself in the process. He may still be in shape, intense and intimidating, but he's also 47 years old and has been out of football for 18 years that have brought a lot of changes—new rules, new plays, a new game. If Harris does break Brown's record, then in time someone else will break Harris' record. And if Jim Brown plans to stage a comeback every time his record is broken, he's going to be playing football for a very long time.
Greta J. Ernst
Canterbury, N.H.

Robert Christopher
Having recently returned from a year of study in Japan, I would like to express my fervent wish that Robert Christopher, author of The Japanese Mind: The Goliath Explained, be born in his next life as an intelligent, creative Japanese woman forced by rigid societal constraints into a lifetime of unpaid subservience. Perhaps then he/she would be qualified to write about the wonders of the Japanese corporate system. In the meantime, he might ask himself just how much respect Japanese business managers pay to their female employees, who are generally stuck in low-level, dead-end jobs and "eased out" of the labor force altogether by the age of 30. I can assure you that such women are not convinced that they will enjoy the fruits of any gain in productivity.
Yvonne Vowels
Eugene, Oreg.

Robert Christopher replies: "There is no doubt that the situation of women in Japanese industry is deplorable, but much less deplorable than it was a decade ago, and I'm quite confident it is going to be infinitely better a decade from now."
—ED.

Cornelia Guest
Who is Cornelia Guest and what in the world is a deb? We were reading this issue and happened to notice in Star Tracks that yet again Cornelia was deemed deserving of space in your magazine. Surely there are other people, even Oscar winners, that you could write about. It's a Kafkaesque dream; at 20, Miss Guest is becoming a major cultural figure despite the fact that she has contributed nothing more than having been born into the right family. We would like to see her forced into a month of hard labor, that is, 30 days of making beds and washing dishes after working all day at a desk and riding the subway to work.
Maria O'Neill
Kate Perri
New York City

Picks & Pans
In her review of Something About Amelia, Jane Hall mentioned "one horrendous scene that is almost kitsch, [in which] the disgraced father gets turned on while watching a Shirley Temple movie." The movie clip showed a young Shirley singing lovingly and adoringly to her father. At the same time, I saw Amelia's father, portrayed by Ted Danson, reduced to tears while he watched Shirley sing, reminded of his own once-adoring little girl. He was obviously feeling deep shame and regret at having caused his daughter so much pain. I'm glad that I watched the film despite the fact that Miss Hall made it sound like a joke. The film had its faults; however, I think the makers achieved their goal of giving hope to parents with a problem, and especially to children, the victims of incest.
Fran Gianni
Fort Lee, N.J.

Jane Hall replies: "Several members of the PEOPLE staff who screened the film shared the view that the father was 'turned on' in the scene. More important, the fact that Amelia tackled a worthy subject—incest—does not exempt it from criticism on its merits as a TV drama."
—ED.

Yuppies
I disagree with the writers of The Yuppie Handbook on only one key point. Although Yuppies do equip their kitchens with the latest culinary gadgetry, we do not waste time using that equipment. It's mostly just for looks. A true Yuppie survives on goodies from a gourmet deli because he is too busy pursuing a six-figure income, a muscled physique and a perpetual tan to cook seriously!
Eli Portnoy
New York City

Quiet Riot
During high school, my gang started drinking "for fun," and for many it became a problem. I'm a mother now and hope this will not become a problem for my son. Pressure on kids to drink comes too often from the entertainment industry. The band Quiet Riot, for example, telegraphs a mixed message. Vocalist Kevin DuBrow said in your story: "Those people who burn out, on drugs or whatever, didn't deserve [their success] in the first place. I have no sympathy for bands who blow it." Yet he swigs cold herbal tea from a Jack Daniel's bottle. This 28-year-old man is making a statement with that bottle to his adolescent audience that he doesn't even believe in. This is irresponsible.
Carol McIntyre
Vancouver

David Hoffman
Although I enjoyed David Hoffman's book The Joy of Pigging Out, I must make one observation between bites. True piggers never squander their time writing books. They live by the axiom: So little time, so much food.
Susannah Griffin
Millsboro, Del.