Bo Derek
Bo Derek (PEOPLE, Feb. 27) is hardly a "no-talent." The box office success of her low-budget ($5.5 million) Tarzan, the Ape Man proved her talents as a producer. The Dereks may be striking out in Hollywood, but Bo's boo-boo did make the cover of PEOPLE.
Maria Godoy
Franklin, Mich.

We have all seen Bo in her entirety in previous movies, so I can see no logical reason to spend more money to see her on-screen again.
Patricia A. Murphy
Grand Rapids, Mich.

Bo Derek may be attractive—and many would dispute that—but I've always maintained that millions of American women, working as lawyers, plumbers and seamstresses, would provoke the same response Bo does if you took away three-fourths of their clothing and perched them in a seductive pose. Most women would rather put a little more value in their lives than take off their clothes for a living.
Ruth Landau
Phoenix

Since reading your article on Bo Derek, I'm convinced that you should change the name of your magazine to GRANOLA in honor of the fruits, nuts and flakes generally contained therein.
Ron Tackitt
Carlsbad, N.Mex.

Wally George
As far as I can see, the only excuse for Wally George's talk show, Hot Seat, is that it allows him an opportunity to verbally attack guests who oppose his very conservative views. While I agree with some of his ideas, I can't approve of his arrogant technique of insulting his guests to the point that they have no choice but to walk off the show. It disgusts me to see a person getting rich by being rude and immature.
Steve Leonard
Auburn, Wash.

It really annoys me that PEOPLE magazine treats liberals like Jane Fonda with such tender, loving care and then blasts the socks off Wally George, a man who stands up for God, country, the flag, decency and all the rest. Sure Wally can be loud and abrasive at times, but considering some of the creeps that appear on his. program, it's a wonder to me that he can stand to be in the same room with them, let alone carry on a civil conversation. In a world that seems to revel in every kind of perversion and depravity, Wally George is refreshing. I hope he becomes a national sensation.
Mary Lindsey
Manhattan Beach, Calif.

I thought your article on Wally George was in poor taste. There is enough hatred in the world. Please stop making heroes out of such offensive people.
JoAnne Nelson
Anoka, Minn.

Awww! So Wally George is heartsick that his daughter, actress Rebecca De Mornay, won't have anything to do with him because of the way he vilifies people on his show. He can't understand why she can't say, "I don't agree with you...but I love you anyway"? Hey, Wally, instead of dishing out your usual venom, why not try that same approach on your guests, and you might just regain a daughter.
J. Kenneth Poe
Los Angeles

Sugar Ray Seales
Boxing is a sport that brings fame and fortune to a few young men who had little or nothing to begin with. But for every Sugar Ray Leonard, there are at least a hundred boxers like Sugar Ray Seales who end up blind or broke. This is the story of how boxing really works.
Brian W. Smith
Bath, Pa.

Since I read your article on Sugar Ray Seales, I haven't been able to get him off my mind. Seales was loyal and trusting, qualities you don't see much of anymore. Why do some of our Olympic champions become our darlings and flash across our TV screens pushing everything from cereal to personal-hygiene products, while others are never heard of again?
Aline Orr
Palm Springs, Calif.

Picks & Pans
It's true. Ann-Margret can act. And has been doing so for more than 20 years. It's also true that Jeff Jarvis can't review: In fact, as Blanche Dubois says, "only Mr. Edgar Allan Poe could do justice" to him. Ann-Margret didn't remake A Streetcar Named Desire to prove her talent, but to pay homage to a great playwright and to introduce this piece of art to a new generation.
Wayne Staley
Huntington Beach, Calif.

Chatter
Re the Boy George Fan Club Kit: This group of simpletons must be incredibly insecure about their own sexuality to be threatened by the Boy's makeup and smocks. Honestly, carrying Clint Eastwood pictures in their wallets? What's next? Duke Wayne T-shirts? Charles Bronson belt buckles? Lee Marvin earmuffs?
Lisa Anne Di Nicola
Ithaca, N.Y.

Richard Gauntlett
After reading your story on Richard Gauntlett, the man who was convicted of raping his stepdaughter over a period of several years, I am amazed at the solution our society has come up with for protecting such offenders. Mr. Gauntlett was ordered to spend just one year in jail and then take the drug Depo-Provera to lower his sex drive. Psychologically, incest and child abuse are the violent expression of anger toward a family member. Giving a person Depo-Provera does not address the anger he will still carry. And what about the kids who have been and may again be victims of such anger? Do the judges who sentence these people realize the damage that has been done? Most victims will not seek help until they are adults, and by then much harm, perhaps irreparable, has already been done.
Susan A. Wymer
St. Johns, Mich.