OTHERWISE SHE'D HAVE A SHINY NOSE FOR NEWS: She has already written three books, most recently 1985's On Your Own, and now Brooke Shields has decided to plunge even deeper into the world of print. Her next role will be as Brenda Starr, the intrepid, redheaded comic strip reporter. "I've loved Brenda for a long time," says Brooke. "She is the epitome of the perfect woman: professional, brainy, brave, ethical. She loves fashion and, as my mom says, powdering her nose is always a priority."

SO DON'T TALK, SING: Their days of California dreamin' turned into a nightmare, but John Phillips and Michelle Phillips, two of the Mamas and the Papas in the '60s and long divorced, still see each other occasionally—most recently on Donahue, where they turned up together to promote their dueling autobiographies. They exchanged pleasantries about their years together and then turned to some unpleasantries. Observed John after the show: "We get along fine as long as we don't talk to each other."

HE PROBABLY DRIVES A FOREIGN CAR, TOO: Usually the father of the bride gets to pay for the wedding, give the bride away—and be ignored. But when the father is Lee Iacocca, you have to take some note of his presence. The Rev. Anthony Tocco, of St. Hugo of the Hills Catholic Church in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., officiating at the wedding of Kathi Iacocca and advertising copywriter Ned Hentz, cracked up the 400 guests with a reading of a favorite essay on marriage. "You shall be truly married when the sight of the sea makes you dance more joyously than the sight of a new car," he quoted. Then Father Tocco paused, looked at Iacocca and the other guests and said, "I could have left that out, couldn't I?"

JUST LIKE GEORGE STEINBRENNER, EXCEPT HE DOESN'T SING: The movie critics laughed at Pia Zadora when she appeared on film. Then the music critics grudgingly praised her when she took to singing. Now it's the turn of the sportswriters. For three months Pia has been a part owner of Oregon's Portland Beavers, the Philadelphia Phillies' Triple-A baseball team, which is playing .500 ball. Zadora, who can sometimes be found sitting with daughter Katy, 19 months, near the batting cage, thinks of herself as a team mascot. In fact, she's much more: "I go and sing the national anthem, and then I go in the clubhouse and kick butts."

SPOCK 'N' ROLL CHILD-REARING: As they get older, even rockers develop some middle-class values. As parents they often find themselves laying down those same hard-and-fast rules that caused them to rebel as teenagers. Ozzy Osbourne has six children, three from his first marriage and three more with his current wife, and, boy, is he strict. "I have rules and regulations," he says. "I don't allow certain things in my house. Like I don't let the children leave their clothes lying around because where am I going to leave mine?"

AND NOW, IN LIVING COLLAR: For her new book, People As Animals, author and artist Fleur Cowles went around asking 100 celebrities what kind of animal they would like to be reincarnated as. Barbara Walters picked a French poodle named Fifi. "It seems to me that they have wonderful lives," she said of poodles. "They are petted and catered to and usually very much loved. They are fed chopped sirloin, usually sleep on very soft, white pillows and, in general, lead the kind of lives few people do. So that's it for me."