Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell were apparently shocked that their firstborn was a he instead of a she. The proud parents of 8-lb. 4-oz. Wyatt Russell, born July 10 in L.A., "were expecting a girl, based on the prediction of an elderly mountain man who uses a divining rod to foresee the future. During a visit with Goldie, he told her she would have a girl. One of Wyatt's first visitors was Russell's son, Boston, 6, from his marriage to actress Season Hubley. Reports Hubley: "Boston said Wyatt looks like a fuzzy peach, that he's all wrinkly." Does all this mean his parents will demand, "Wyatt, burp!"

On the subject of babies, Michael Landon and third wife Cindy are about to become the parents of Sean Matthew, who is due in August. (After an ultrasound test revealed Sean Matthew's gender, his parents decided to name him.) It is their second child and Landon's ninth.... Not having a baby are singer Carly Simon and drummer Russ Kunkel, who are not having a relationship either. They have split after nearly two years together.... Together again but most certainly not having a baby are rockers Stephen Stills, 41, and Neil Young, 40, who have been rehearsing at Stills's Encino home for a reunion of the original Buffalo Springfield.

Sly Stallone's neighbors in Pacific Palisades are suing the actor because of a brick wall—eight feet higher in some places than the legal limit of four and topped with steel spikes—that he built around his French-style villa. Renato and Laura Gugenheim are seeking $25,000 in damages and have asked the court to order Sly to scale down the fence. "It's an awful wall, just ugly," says Renato. An L.A. zoning commission has granted a variance to Sly, so he could maintain his privacy. But members of the Riviera Estates homeowners association insist that he must adhere to the restrictions agreed to by all owners, including Stallone. Thomas Ferguson, head of the association, has said of the wall: "If everybody did it, we might as well be in San Quentin." Sly's attorney, Jacob A. Bloom, says the association has been harassing Stallone, and he may countersue. Round 2 coming up.

Television evangelist and Ronald Reagan supporter Jimmy Swaggart doesn't think much of young Ron Reagan's public exposure. "It's an abomination!" says Swaggart of the President's son's Saturday Night Live skit in which Ron did a Tom Cruise Risky Business take-off in his underwear. More recently, Reagan did a layout in brief in Vanity Fair. "I saw an excerpt from the SNL show, and I felt embarrassed for the President," says Swaggart. The preacher doesn't buy the President's statement that he found the TV striptease amusing. "He's a nice guy, and he would say something like that in public. But in private I'm sure he's greatly embarrassed. He probably wishes his son would stop doing these things. He does represent his father whether he likes it or not."

It's summertime: Do you know how the celebs' kinfolk spent their vacations? In Greece making The Bentley Academy, a film about punk girls who get sent off to be finished at a European school. The movie stars Patricia Arquette (sister of Rosanna), Paris Vaughn (daughter of Sarah) and real-life sisters Tricia and Joely Fisher (daughters of Connie Stevens and Eddie Fisher).

Then there's Julian Len-non, who flew out of Chicago to join his band for a Springfield, Ill. concert. The only problem was that Julian and his manager, Dean Gordon, landed in Springfield, Mo. After discovering their error, the two chartered a plane and arrived minutes before Julian was due onstage. Imagine.

More tales from the Tarmac: Regulars on the Sunday-night Air France flight from Paris to London could usually count on a speedy check-in—until last week. That's when Joan Collins and hubby Peter Holm arrived with 49 pieces of luggage, which cost the couple an extra $1,300 and had waiting passengers steaming. The bags may have contained the tapes of Joan's recent recording session in which she sang The Last Time I Saw Paris for her Monte Carlo mini-series. Joan and Peter took all the tapes, including the master, with them, lest they fall into the wrong hands—like a music critic's.