If you want to know how to make Clint Eastwood's day—take him to lunch and pick up the tab. Mr. Mayor's reputation as one of the most frugal top guns on the Warner Bros, lot is out of the closet, literally. It seems that multimillionaire Eastwood hangs 'em high—and often. Clint has a habit of taking home all the wooden coat hangers in his office closet and then complaining to the studio that there aren't enough. And. according to one associate, business luncheons with Eastwood are no treat. "Working with Clint over lunch means getting your brains picked and then being charged $3.95 for the club sandwich." But wouldn't you want Eastwood overseeing your city budget?

Director Sergio Leone, godfather of the Italian spaghetti Westerns that helped launch Eastwood's career, says he wants to do a remake of Gone With the Wind. Leone, 65, whose last flick, Once Upon a Time in America, enchanted neither critics nor audiences, says the 1939 Vivien Leigh-Clark Gable masterpiece did not do justice to Margaret Mitchell's book and was too phony looking for his taste. "How can you paint the sky scarlet in the studio and expect people to think it's real?" Should he succeed in his quest, Leone is firm about where he'll shoot exteriors to capture an authentic Southern milieu: the republic of Georgia (Stalin's birthplace) in the U.S.S.R.

Mark Harmon is taking the Rodney Dangerfield route and going back to school. In his next feature, Harmon will do Summer School, a comedy to be directed by Carl Reiner. Harmon will play a happy-go-lucky gym teacher who is reluctantly drafted into teaching English for a summer.

A U.S. Senator probably shouldn't talk this way, but John Kerry, a Democrat from Massachusetts, was clearly irked by reports linking him to Morgan Fairchild after the pair were seen acting chummy at a Martha's Vineyard restaurant. That's "crap!" was the official denial issued from the Senator's office. Through an aide, Kerry did tell a Boston newspaper that he first met Fairchild at a Democratic fund raiser in L.A. last year and then "bumped into" her again two months ago in Israel, where he was on a fact finding mission and she was shooting Sleeping Beauty.

Hi ho! Hi ho! It's off to the sound booth they go! An animated feature, Snow White and the Seven Dwarf Elves, due out next year, will be dubbed by an all-star cast: Dom DeLuise as the voice of the mirror on the wall, Irene Cara as Snow White, and Tracey Ullman, Carol Channing, Zsa Zsa Gabor and Sally Keller-man as the elves, and Joni Mitchell as Mother Nature.

And they called it poppycock! Paul Anka is denying reports that he'll run for mayor of Monterey, Calif., where he lives. "I shall not run for office," declares Anka. "And if elected, I shall not serve. I'm flattered, but politics isn't my thing. Besides, if Eastwood is having trouble with the Carmel City Council, a simple 'Go Ahead—Make My Day' will keep them in tow. I doubt a stern chorus of Put Your Head on My Shoulder could accomplish the same thing." No, but he might try My Way.

That wretched scene in the movie Pirates, in which Walter Matthau and Chris Campion eat half a dead rat (Matthau gets the end cut), may be repelling viewers, but it tickled Cannon Films honcho Menachem Golan pink. When the rat-eating scene came on during a screening, the audience winced, but someone sitting near Golan said the mogul cried with childlike glee: "Wonderful! Isn't that wonderful! The kids will love it!" For those who don't love it, executive producer Thorn Mount, clears everything up: "The movie is a comedy, and this is a very humorous scene. Our prop department is to be commended for how realistic the rat looks." And how realistic is it? "It's a well-disguised Rock Cornish game hen. Walter thought it was delicious and would have gladly eaten some more." Seconds? Make that ratatouille!