Rock singer Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac has checked into the Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, Calif. Unlike fellow celeb Chevy Chase, who left the center two weeks after entering for a dependence on painkillers, Nicks, 38, is expected to stay for the full six-week treatment.

It seems that the crew of the lucrative Star Trek series is being held hostage by the Paramount business office, and not even Scotty can beam them out. Although the orbiting starship Enterprise has raked in more than $1 billion since its launching 20 years ago, the perennial co-stars—McCoy, Scotty, Sulu, Uhura and Chekov—worked for less than $100,000 each in the newest blockbuster, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, opening next week. According to an insider, "The studio has them over a barrel and they know it. The crew has been so severely typecast that they have had a hard time finding other work. If they complain about their cut, they know they'll be written out of the next project." The top command isn't suffering, though: William Shatner, Captain Kirk, is getting around $2 million, while Leonard Nimoy as Spock (he's directing too) will earn about $3 million.

In Craig Zadan's new book, Sondheim & Co., Len Cariou, Liz Taylor's co-star in the 1978 movie A Little Night Music, says Ol' Violet Eyes wasn't too savvy about singing. While recording Send in the Clowns with the London Symphony Orchestra, "it was very tense because Elizabeth wasn't exactly sure what a measure of music was," recalls Cariou. "She didn't know when to start singing. She would always miss it by about half a beat. And it just didn't work. So I said to her, 'Okay, every time there's an entrance, I'll squeeze your shoulder when we sing together, then I'll tap you on the shoulder and I'll point to myself when I sing, and I'll point to you when you sing.' " Who says Liz won't take direction?

On behalf of celebrity gorillas everywhere, King Kong will march on the Hollywood Walk of Fame selection committee this week to protest his recent rejection. Johnny Grant, head of the committee, says Kong, whose latest effort is King Kong Lives, isn't ready for his own star. Kong's mad. But Grant says: "There are three requirements: professional achievement, longevity and community involvement. I haven't seen Kong out there rolling any bandages or visiting the sick." Of Kong's peers who have received stars, Grant says, "Rin Tin Tin did make personal appearances during the war, and Mickey Mouse has always been socially conscious."

After pouring some 30,000 Scotch mists, Love Boat bartender Ted Lange has drifted back to his home port to star in That's My Mama Now. The show is a sequel to the 1974 series he starred in and is being revived for first-run syndication next year. In the new episodes Lange will once again be Junior and Theresa Merritt will return as Mama.

Beverly Sassoon has such confidence in her new line of cosmetics that they are all she'll be wearing in an issue of Playboy soon. Once married to master hairstylist Vidal, and once involved with Erik Estrada, the 41-year-old divorcee is also going to help write the copy (as if anybody reads it). "It's going to be a first-rate pictorial and editorial," vows her publicist. But that's what publicists always say.

Here's one for Karl Malden. While fun couple John and Bo Derek were shoe shopping in Rome recently, a band of thieves entered the store and managed to lift from Bo's purse about $10,000 in traveler's checks, $7,500 in American dollars and Bo's new passport. This came on the heels of their misfortune a week earlier in Paris: Somebody broke into their hotel room and stole Bo's wallet, credit cards and passport. Maybe the Dereks just shouldn't leave home. Period.