Correspondents had nothing but good things to say about cover subject John Travolta (PEOPLE, NOV. 14), congratulating him for success in both his professional and personal life. They were harsh in their judgments of Susan Smith, who has confessed to killing her two small children. And they emphatically defended the magazine against a reader's complaint that our recent cover story on teenage pregnancy (Oct. 24) was too serious and that we should confine ourselves to "celebrity gossip."

JOHN TRAVOLTA
What a refreshing guy. Here's an actor who really made something of himself without letting success go to his head—without resorting to drug abuse or to dumping his spouse. He loves his planes, but it sounds to me like he's got his feet firmly planted on the ground.
GORDON WILSON, Lake Oswego, Ore.
73551.517@CompuServe.com

Back when John Travolta's engagement was announced, I wrote to tell John to forget Kelly Preston, he could do better. Well, looks like I have to eat my words. Congratulations on proving me wrong!
JULIA LATIMER, Chester, Va.
jalbjh@aol.com

I grew up with John Travolta in Englewood, N.J. We had a friendship and a passion for theater in common. Eventually we landed our first professional summer-stock jobs together. Please, for the record, John is anything but gay! The man has always had a healthy and impassioned interest in the opposite sex. As for his immense success, he deserves every happiness.
RENEE SCHILIZZO, Willimantic, Conn.

John Travolta should ignore the rumors about his sexuality. As a gay man who has heard them all, I can tell him that there is only one reason why they continue to exist: wishful thinking! Straight women aren't the only ones who appreciate the inherent sexiness of Vinnie Barbarino, Tony Manero or Vincent Vega (belly included).
RICK PARK, Boston

MAIL
Unlike reader Maureen Gilligan of Des Plaines, Ill., I was not disappointed in your cover story "Babies Who Have Babies." I was angered, however, by her attitude that PEOPLE should not print articles concerning "serious issues." She and a growing number of the American public would prefer to read fluff rather than responsible pieces that might help your readers. Perhaps she would be happier reading tabloid accounts of alien visitations to earth.
JANA LOCKE, Amarillo, Tex.

SUSAN SMITH
Knowing what we all know now, I feel nothing but outrage and disgust for Susan Smith. Not only did she have an entire nation praying for the safe return of her two beautiful boys, she toyed with the emotions of these who cared for her and her children the most. Whatever possessed this pathetic excuse for a mother to perform such an act of cold-blooded murder, only she can comprehend.
JULIE HADLEY, Bramalea, Ont.

Not only has Susan Smith committed a heinous crime, but she has also played upon the racist feelings of too many white Americans who were all too ready to believe her claim that a black gunman took her children—despite obvious discrepancies in her story.
TANYA JOHNS, Southfield, Mich.

If Susan Smith is genuinely sorry for murdering her two sons, she should waive her right to a trial, throw herself on the mercy of the court and accept the punishment handed out (no matter how severe) with her mouth shut and head bowed.
MARY D. WELCH, Orange Park, Fla.

HOLLYWOOD EX-WIVES CLUB
How sad that these bitter women have nothing better to do than lament their marriages years after their divorces. They are an insult to the millions of women who also made sacrifices during their marriages, but who have gone on to lead meaningful, productive lives after their marriages ended. Perhaps this is because most women aren't spoiled by the privileges of a Hollywood marriage. It's time this group quits their whining, develops their own identities and moves on with their lives. No one feels sorry for them but them.
LINDA JARRETT, Talent, Ore.

R.L STINE
R.L. Stine is most definitely wrong when he says that no one over the age of 14 has ever heard of him. I'm definitely over 14, have heard of him and owe him a debt of gratitude. After I spent an incredible amount of money on sports and wrestling magazines to impress upon my 11-year-old son that reading can be fun (failing in the process), up pops the Goosebumps series in our school's annual book fair. My son was hooked! Now reading is something that he gladly does, and he has found that it is fun. Mr. Stine, you're a miracle worker.
JOAN L. DINIZIO, Greenport, N. Y.