PREPARTUM OBSESSION
"The toughest part of being pregnant," says Arnold Schwarzenegger, "is the food cravings." He speaks from experience. The iron man got so involved playing an expectant mom in the new comedy Junior that his will gave way with his (fake) waistline. "I just went wild," says Schwarzenegger, 47, aided by Danny De Vito as his obstetrician. "I never eat food that isn't sound, but one night on the set I was wearing my seven-month pregnancy pads, and when I saw a huge bowl of chocolate mousse I just dug in." Other nights he indulged in hamburgers "with fries!" and consumed half a pecan pie. He did not, however, eat pickles or quit smoking. "I have one cigar a day," says Schwarzenegger. "But I don't recommend that to pregnant women."

FATHER DELUISE FLAMBÉ
Woody Allen makes his TV-movie debut in Don't Drink the Water, a remake of his 1969 farce about an American family held captive in the Eastern European country of Vulgaria (ABC, Dec. 18). Dom DeLuise, who plays a priest-magician, attests to the actor-director's legendary unflappability. "Woody is so understated," says DeLuise, 61. One scene called for DeLuise's Bible to catch fire as he presides over the marriage of Michael J. Fox and Mayim Bialik, but the shoot kept getting interrupted. "During each delay, I added more lighter fluid," says DeLuise. "By the time I finally lit the book, the explosion was so massive my beard caught fire and my scarf went up in flames. And Woody, very deadpan, quietly said, 'Is that what you had in mind?' "

STREET MUSIC
Just seven years ago, Cassandra Lucas and Charisse Rose, now 24 and better known as the pop-duo Changing Faces, were 11th graders at Manhattan's High School of Performing Arts. Now they have a debut album, Changing Faces, and a gold single, "Stroke You Up." In a competitive market, how did the two land a record deal? "By singing on the street at 22nd and Broadway," says Lucas. "We were supposed to meet with [a record exec], but we were late. By the time we got to the studio, he was leaving. So we sang 'God Bless the Child' right on the sidewalk. It was around 5 o'clock, and everybody was getting off work. Even businessmen in suits and ties stopped to look at us. I was so embarrassed, I couldn't tell you what any of those faces looked like. But mine must have been red."

MIRACLE WORKER
The remake of Miracle on 34th Street is out, and so is the truth: "I don't believe in Santa," says Mrs. Doubtfire's, Mara Wilson, 7, who plays the skeptic who confronts Kris Kringle. "I'm Jewish. But my friends think he's real, so I tell them that I believe in Santa. I don't want them to feel bad." Wilson feels good about acting, but there's one part of the job she could do without. "Reading scripts!" she says. "They're bad if I'm reading and reading and it seems like it'll never end."