IT WAS, LIKE, SO TRIPPY. A QUARTER CENTURY AFTER PROVIDING, THE PSYCHEDELIC sound track for the loved-in, drugged-out '60s, surviving members of the Doors, Cream, Sly and the Family Stone, and Creedence Clearwater Revival were inducted last week into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. If the rockers had grayed a bit since their heydays, their appeal hadn't, judging by the reaction of the crowd of 1,400 at L.A.'s luxe Century Plaza Hotel. Also attending the $750-a-plate affair—the money destined for Cleveland's still unbuilt Hall of Fame museum—were fellow enshrinees Ruth Brown, 65, Etta James, 55, and TV deejay Dick Clark, 63 (Irish soul man Van Morrison, 47, was a no-show). The highlight? Cream's Jack Bruce, 49, Ginger Baker, 53, and Eric Clapton, 47, playing together for the first time in 25 years. Said a choked-up Clapton: "I've been reunited with two people I love very dearly."