MORPHEUS RISING
By Hollywood standards, Juliette Lewis, 19, and Brad Pitt, 27, are considered an uncommonly comely couple. Not so, counters the actress. "I'm not a classic beauty by any means," Lewis told Australia's Sydney Morning Herald. "But that's good. There's so much you can do with a face like this. Sure, I can look good if I work hard on myself, but I can also look like a real ordinary person. Now Brad is something else. Sometimes I watch him sleeping, and he looks like [a] Greek god. Or he goes out with his shirt half-buttoned, and I have to say, 'Hon, don't do that—you don't know what it docs to people.

DEFINITE MAYBE
"Middle-aged love seems pretty prevalent in the culture," says Shirley MacLaine, 58. "Why isn't it on the screen?" It is in Used People, in which she stars as a 1960s Jewish widow caught up in an unexpected romance with Italian widower Marcello Mastroianni. But will MacLaine, whose 28-year marriage to producer Sieve Parker ended in 1982, take a cue from her character and marry again? "I'm too young," she says. "Sometime around 75 I'll lake an option on some delightful man—and there are a few—and say, 'How would urn lee I about renewing this option every year?

BUTTING OUT
In Forever Young, Mel Gibson plays a test pilot frozen in 1939 and defrosted, intact, 53 years later. To enhance his own longevity, the actor quit drinking several years ago and has now kicked another bad habit: smoking. "I decided to quit after I played tennis with my dad for three hours," says Gibson, 37. "He's 73, and he ran around the court and wasn't very puffed afterward. That's kinda cool. I'd like to still be running around the court when my six kids are older, instead of them visiting me in an iron lung."

FROM RICHES TO RAGS
The second album from Bell Biv DeVoe, the multiplatinum hip-hop group, will be tilled Hootie Mock. "When we sit down and come up with ideas, we call it hootie-macking," explains trio member Ronnie DeVoe, 25. One notion to emerge from their sessions: Mental Wear, a clothing line they hope will spill up music-world fashion. "You have groups coming out in videos wearing ski masks," laments DeVoe. "I think people are ready for it to smooth out just a little. Not all the way to where everyone is wearing a tie and the whole nine, like Wall Street. But I think that sweaters will start coming back in."