MAIL PERSPECTIVE
Cheers' Bebe Neuwirth thinks many of her fans should take correspondence courses. "I tell you, I find fan mail real depressing," says Neuwirth, 30-some-thing, who plays psychiatrist Lilith Sternin-Crane on the hit NBC sitcom. "I mean, the grammatical errors, the spelling errors I see, and I'm not even being a stickler about this. All I'm saying is, 'Honey, how about a period?' "

NEW RACKET
Tennis ace and pinup boy Yannick Noah is into different strokes these days. Although he's still playing in tournaments, the onetime French Open champion has embarked on a new career as a pop singer. Noah has recorded his first record, Black and What!, currently available only in France. "To perform onstage, that's my goal now," Noah, 31, told French journalists. "I need to be in contact with the public. I want to continue to live and to do things I love. At 30, the sentence is the same for all athletes: 'You are finished.' But I am not dead! It's the beginning of my life." He added, "Onstage, the last refrain is like match point, and when you've finished, there's an adrenaline rush that's vital for me. I don't want to remember my victory [at the French Open] by the fireplace."

NO KIDDING
"I don't feel any less of a woman, any less fulfilled," actress Victoria Tennant said in London's Daily Mail about the fact that she and husband Steve Martin are childless. As to friends who have kids, Tennant, 40, said, "They have lost many of the things I have. They've lost the privacy of their home, of their marriage. They have a slightly different relationship with their husbands. They can't lead as spontaneous an existence. I feel my life is complete. Maybe one day I'll find there is a gap which only a child will fill. Now I have a life that would be completely changed by a child."

GINGER-LY SPEAKING
Old-time movie star Ginger Rogers, who turns 80 next month, doesn't dance around the fact that she is frustrated by those who say she learned everything she knew about fancy footwork from her onscreen dancing partner Fred Astaire. "You know, everybody seems to think he was my Svengali and I was his protégée, but that wasn't the case, dear heart," says Rogers, whose autobiography, Ginger: My Story, is due in October. "I danced in two New York shows before I met him, so he didn't teach me anything. I was just fortunate to be in movies with him."