SCENESTOPPER
Warren Beatty, who won the Best Director Oscar for Reds in 1981, then made cinema-bomb history by producing Ishtar in 1987, is directing Touchstone's Dick Tracy in his standard painstaking style. Crew members on the L.A. set have grumbled that Beatty's constant reshooting means that props must be available in extraordinary numbers while the extra takes are eating up their meal time. One shot required Madonna, who plays sultry Breathless Mahoney, simply to enter a room, take off her jacket and run her hands down her sides. It reportedly took 25 takes. But Touchstone's Terry Press, denying the reshooting is excessive, says the studio isn't worried: "Meal penalties are no big deal."... In other Madonna news, it seems whatever relationship the singer had with Jason LaFargo, 19, a production assistant on her Pepsi spot, has lost its fizzle. According to Jason's half brother, Steve Rodgers, "Jason knew they couldn't go the distance. He wanted someone his age [Madonna is 30]. They're still friends." Steve adds he was worried Jason "would become Madonna's bimbo. But I told him, 'If Sean Penn comes up to you, let him hit you, 'cause then you can take the house in Malibu.' "

HOLLYWOOD JESSE
The Reverend Jesse Jackson, playing himself, will appear on the April 27 episode of A Different World, offering advice to Dwayne Wayne on how to campaign in the student council race. Jackson, who agreed to do the show after being approached by Bill Cosby and co-producer Debbie Allen, apparently has a real knack for playing himself. The former presidential candidate ad-libbed his final speech on-camera.

FEAR AND LOATHING
Screw magazine publisher Al Goldstein's outrageous conduct has finally backfired on him badly. The day after he ran a full-page ad offering $1 million to anyone who assassinated the Ayatollah Khomeini, Goldstein received 16 death threats. When more followed, he says, his terrified secretary quit. Goldstein says he ran the ad in response to Khomeini's $2.6 million bounty on Satanic Verses author Salman Rushdie. Now the publisher says the police and FBI have been called in and he is "under close guard." After more than 50 threats to date, Goldstein adds, "I am really concerned for my safety and don't want to trivialize this by making it a press event. This is extremely serious, and we're dealing with really crazy people." As far as the sanity and legality of his ad, he says, "I wish the government would arrest me for it. I would love to be in their custody right now."