THREE MEN AND BABY TALK
Before Bruce Willis was a twinkle in the ear of director Amy (National Lampoon's European Vacation) Heckerling, she considered other Hollywood tykecoons for the baby's voice-overs in the new Kirstie Alley-John Travolta movie, Look Who's Talking. The film, about one opinionated baby's take on the world, baby-sitters and parents, called for a wry, smart-aleck voice. Two who were considered were Steve Martin and Robin Williams. Heckerling says she played their comedy albums while screening the film's baby footage. "Robin was too fast-talking for our baby, so we never had a discussion or made an offer. I liked Steve, but we were told he never does voice-overs. Bruce is perfect because he has an airy, quiet kind of voice. It's sophisticated, and the baby is very knowing."

DON'T CRY, YET, FOR MERYL
Meryl Streep last month said she was too exhausted to play Eva Peron in the film version of Broadway's Evita. She has just finished back-to-back shooting on She Devil and Postcards from the Edge. Now Meryl might be changing her tune. Her renewed interest pleases producer Robert Stigwood, but not director Oliver (Wall Street) Stone, who had been working on Evita for 18 months. Stone has moved on to a movie about dead rocker Jim Morrison. "I am going to bring in a new director and use Stone's screenplay," says Stigwood. "There are many brilliant directors, but only one Meryl Streep."

STUPID STAR TRICKS
Call it Methadone Acting: To research her role in Homegirl, a film she's co-writing and hopes to star in about street kids and drugs, Apollonia (Purple Rain) bought marijuana from an 11-year-old girl in L.A.'s MacArthur Park. The cops, showing no respect for such thespian verisimilitude, arrested her on a misdemeanor charge and confiscated her black Mercedes-Benz. She's to appear in court later this month. "I realize now how stupid it was. I'll never do that sort of research again," says Apollonia. "But it seemed the only way to know what buying drugs on the streets was all about. Matt Dillon injected water into his vein to see what shooting up felt like for Drugstore Cowboy, and Robert De Niro gains a lot of weight for his roles." Dillon's manager, Vic Ramos, sees no parallel. He says Matt, playing an addict, shot purified water into his veins only during the actual filming. "It was very nerve-racking for the crew to watch," says Ramos.