PILLOW TALK
Cindy Crawford, who recently began a six-week stint doing NBC's Later, loves the work—but only as a guest host. "For the right person, this would be the ideal job," says Crawford, 31, of the 1:35 a.m. talk show formerly hosted by Bob Costas and Greg Kin-near. "You don't go into the studio until noon, so I've been working out in the morning. You're there [taping] until 7 or 7:30, then you go right to dinner and you already have your makeup and hair done." But she rarely watches the show. "The only time I'm ever awake at 2 in the morning, I'm in Europe, jet-lagged, watching CNN, because that's the only thing in English," she says. "I don't want to watch Baywatch in French."

PSYCHOLOGY TODAY
To celebrate its 100th episode on Nov. 11, the Seattle-based Frasier is airing its first show actually shot in that city—but David Hyde Pierce is just as happy on Stage 25 of L.A.'s Paramount Studios. "Frasier's not the kind of show that needs to shoot on location," says Hyde Pierce, 38, who plays uptight shrink Niles Crane. "We've got it right there with one big projection [shot] of the Space Needle." His interest in psychology remains only actorly. "Anyone who asked me to recommend a therapist would be crazy," says Hyde Pierce, who has never seen a shrink. "They're more likely to come to me for advice about wine." But he's got one relaxation tip. "Mud baths," he says. "Even though it's hard to get clean afterward."

WORKING MAN
Stanford University undergrad Fred Savage sees smooth sailing for famous frosh Chelsea Clinton. "I was a novelty when I first got to school," says the former star of The Wonder Years, "but it wore off. They didn't really treat me differently at all." Now a 21-year-old senior, Savage is on leave to headline the NBC sitcom Working, but he still visits campus pals. "It's fun to be at school and not have to worry about classes," he says. "When I was last there, everyone was freaking out, stressing about work." But Savage's school days cost him his lead in the familial race to fame. His brother Ben, 17, is in his fifth season as star of ABC's Boy Meets World. "Now a lot of people mistake me for Ben," says Savage. But there's no rivalry: "We talk about work very little. We've got brother stuff to deal with."

DANGEROUS LIAISON
So how did R & B great Isaac Hayes wind up lending his hot-buttered baritone to the school chef on Comedy Central's cult-hit cartoon, South Park? For one thing, the man can cook. "On the soul-food side, I can make anything: corn bread, collard greens, yams, macaroni and cheese," rumbles Hayes, 55. "I don't have to buy my gravy in a can." So far, his character's finest moment has been serenading—and bedding—a cartoon Kathie Lee Gifford. "Oh, man," says Hayes. "I asked [the producers], 'You guys sure you know what you're doing? We're protected against lawsuits and stuff?' They said, 'We're cool.' I said, 'What about me? I'll never do Regis & Kathie Lee again.' I thought about sending her flowers the day after the thing aired. But that would have made a statement that I was guilty."