From PEOPLE Magazine Click to enlarge
Patsy & Peggy Lynn

"As long as they were standing together, I could tell them apart," says their mom, country legend Loretta Lynn. These days, the 33-year-old sisters—both married to musicians, Patsy the mother of three, Peggy of one—want fans to see them together as country singing act The Lynns, whose self-titled debut album came out in February. "I thought they should work together," says Mama proudly. "But I had to wait till they took a notion to do it themselves."

Peggy: When it comes to clothes, with $500 I'll buy two great pieces, and Patsy will come home with 10 bags from Wal-Mart.

Patsy: And the rest of Peggy's clothes are all my Wal-Mart clothes she swiped from my bag! Since I'm taller [by a half inch] than Peggy [5'4], if she wears my clothes, they're a little looser on her, and if I wear hers, they're a little more snug. How much do you weigh, Peggy?

Peggy: Absolutely none of your business!

Patsy: We're constantly competing with each other.

Peggy: Patsy is the neater one. Her house is spotless. She makes her bed every morning. I'm more the type that says, "Why? You're going to get right back in it."

Patsy: The downside of being a twin is that you do always have a shadow. But the upside is you have a best friend

Peggy: You're born with a soul-mate, an incredible gift you're given from the beginning!

Alexandra & Caroline Paul

Age 34 and born in Manhattan, they're an identical study in contrasts. While Alexandra Paul was warming up the beach for five years as a Baywatch babe, Caroline was turning down the heat as a professional firefighter. Alexandra left Baywatch in 1996 and lives in Malibu with actor-boyfriend Ian Murray. Caroline, who this month published Fighting Fire (St. Martin's Press), her account of joining the mostly male San Francisco force, lives there with her partner Trisha Lee, a lawyer.

Caroline: It's funny being famous for someone you're not. I never give autographs, though sometimes people insist. They don't believe me!

Alexandra: Caroline was always more athletic than me growing up. I was better at school.

Caroline: Now she's athletic and I'm a writer. She's prettier.

Alexandra: No, I think she has a much nicer nose than I have. And her eyes are nicer, too.

Caroline: I call Alexandra for all my makeup tips. I'll get this envelope with a tube of lipstick in it and it'll say, "Use this."

Alexandra: Our mother tells us to put on blush, so we do. Her other tip is a firm handshake and looking people straight in the eyes.

Caroline: I'm in my 30s now, but I don't mind looking older, do you?

Alexandra: [silence]

Caroline: Okay, so that's our difference.

Wil & Kin Shriner

The 44-year-old sons of humorist Herb Shriner, host of the '50s game show Two for the Money, followed their father into TV. After his own mid-'80s talk show and five seasons on ABC's Home show, Wil, a Woodland Hills, Calif., divorced father of two, is back on the stand-up comedy circuit and hopes to direct sitcoms. Kin has made a career out of Scotty Baldwin, the character he created in 1977 on General Hospital and now plays on the ABC soap Port Charles. Never married, he lives on a houseboat in Marina Del Ray, Calif., and is the elder by eight minutes.

Kin: Those were the happiest eight minutes of my life.

Wil: That was my joke! You stole my line!...You got money?

Kin: Yeah.

Wil: That's the good thing about being twins. When one's working, the other is freeloading. Thank God, Kin has had steady work.

Kin: I have a love scene coming up next week, and I have to lose 10 pounds. It's my first love scene in a while. Ah, forget the weight, I'll just pay the camera guys $10 to keep the camera high.

Wil: Kin is a daytime hunk. I never achieved hunk status.

Kin: We've sort of found our individuality. As kids we were forced to dress in sailor suits. If we had on the same shirts, I would say, "Take it off. We look alike!"

Wil: If looking like a twin is like looking in a mirror, it's a really bad mirror.

Kin: I hope I don't see that much gray on my head.

Sam & Sean Manuel

Their physical therapist father, who was African-American, died of leukemia when they were 9, but the 6'2" football frères still sport "a smile just like his," says their Italian-American mother, Francine, also a physical therapist. "Warm, big smiles, with dimples on both sides." Raised in El Sobrante, Calif., the duo, 24, studied psychology at New Mexico State University before being drafted by the San Francisco 49ers in 1996. Both single, they're spending this off-season playing with NFL Europe: 245-lb. Kansas City Chiefs tight end Sean with the England Monarchs, 235-lb. linebacker Sam, currently a free agent, with the Scottish Claymores.

Sean: I'm more of an extrovert, and Sam's more of an introvert.

Sam: He says what I think. That's the truth. We think the same way.

Sean: Sam might have a little more of my mom and I might have a little more of my dad. When I look at my brother, I don't see myself, I just see a sharp-looking guy.

Sam: Our eyebrows are our best features. When we get a compliment, it's about the eyebrows. But we look our best when we're suited up to go on the field.

Sean: That's it. Pregame—that's when we look our best.

Sam: When I was released from the 49ers [in 1997], Sean decided to leave too.

Sean: We didn't want to be separated. That's the most important thing about us. Whatever fate falls on one, falls on the other.

Joan Boyd & Jayne Schwartz

In 1959, the 21-year-old pair became household names as the original Doublemint twins, seen in TV commercials up to 20 times a day. Now 59, Joan Boyd and Jayne Schwartz still exchange daily phone calls and visit often between Beverly Hills, where Jayne, the mother of three, lives with her producer-husband, Al, and Chicago, where Joan, a divorced mother of three and grandmother of three, works as a receptionist.

Jayne: I don't think anybody could ever say, "Boy, those girls are beautiful." But they did say, "Aren't they cute?" We were cute.

Joan: The older I get, I like a softer look. Less is better.

Jayne: I like to be a little more dramatic, more pizzazzy. If I think I'm okay, then I'll up it one. One time I visited Joan and told her to have her skirts shortened. She said, "Oh, no, I'm in the business world." I said, "I don't care, you've got damn good legs, so show them."

Joan: Jayne is definitely my beauty expert. I get dressed up, and she says, "You're not going like that, not with me you're not." She changes what I'm wearing.

Jayne: And I make her add more blush.

Joan: When my sister goes to the market or post office, she looks very elegant. I'm in awe of her. I'm not as anxious to suffer for beauty as I think my sister is.

Jayne: I'm not doing it for anybody, but just to feel better. Then I look in the mirror and say, "Not bad for an old broad."

Keith & Derek Brewer

The matched set of 5'11" models, 24, share a Hermosa Beach, Calif., house as well as degrees in finance, a Web site (brewertwins.com) and a wardrobe. They also split their $2,000-a-day paychecks from posing for the likes of Esprit and Old Navy. For Rolling Stone, they even shared Cindy Crawford.

Derek: Sometimes clients will say, "Send either one."

Keith: And we decide who gets the job based on who worked last.

Derek: We do the same things, eat the same food. When I meet someone new, I keep saying "we" instead of "I." The only thing I do that Keith doesn't do is golf.

Keith: We wanted to be pro surfers growing up, but if you're not in the Top 10 the money is tough. We wanted something more steady, so in 1991 we walked into a modeling agency, and two weeks later we were doing a shoot with Steven Meisel for the cover of Italian Glamour.

Derek: We both wear 40 regular jackets, but Keith has a slightly bigger chest, which I hate to admit.

Keith: My chest is my best feature. And my girlfriend prefers my longer nose.

Derek: It's funny, but whoever has a girlfriend always gets told, "Oh, you're so much better-looking than your brother."

Keith: C'mon, you know I'm better-looking.

Brittany & Cynthia Daniel

At age 14, the Sweet Valley High stars, now 22, were Ford models and Doublemint twins. But when the Gainesville, Fla., cheerleader (Cynthia) and National Honor Society scholar (Brittany) stopped growing at 5'7"—often considered too short for runway work—they set out for Hollywood, where they share a house in Studio City. Since 1994, Cynthia, who dates actor Cole (Good Will Hunting) Hauser, has played good twin Elizabeth, and Brittany, who is between beaux, has played bad twin Jessica on the syndicated UPN show, which last year completed its final season.

Cynthia: I like to sit home at night and watch Jerry Springer.

Brittany: I want to go out and have a good time.

Cynthia: When we were younger, Brittany was more flirtatious than me. I couldn't work it like she did.

Brittany: In high school, we rebelled because we got tired of being considered one person.

Cynthia: I went earthy, with lots of vintage wear and combat boots.

Brittany: I was more into the L.A. look, not as funky.

Cynthia: We never go for the same guys. I like tall guys because when I hug someone, I want to be able to bury my head in his chest.

Brittany: I usually go for the boyish look, the sweet puppy-dog face, more than Cynthia.

Cynthia: In a movie theater, Brittany will get up and move if someone nearby is chewing popcorn too loud.

Brittany: Cynthia identifies every odor in a room. She'll say, 'What's that smell?'

Cynthia: Brittany talks too loud on the phone.

Brittany: Shut up, Cynthia.

Nifa & Nishan Hindes

Two years ago, modeling agencies started approaching the pair of 6-foot beauties, 19, on the streets of London. The Gloucestershire natives, whose English father and Indian-Fijian mother are both teachers, were soon appearing in Vogue, on runways and as sirens in the miniseries The Odyssey. Last summer, they filmed roles as aliens in George Lucas's forthcoming Star Wars prequel.

Nishan: Liam Neeson came up and talked to us. I'm sure it had nothing to do with the fact that we were both naked and painted green!

Nifa: It's really important for our career to look the same. Designers like the novelty of us being twins.

Nishan: Whatever differences we had before, we had to get rid of for the modeling.

Nifa: When I started modeling, I had streaks in my hair and a nose stud!

Nishan: We're not identical, as you first assume. I've got a wide-eyed look, more Indian. Nifa looks meaner. I've got broader shoulders, so I get more of the sports jobs.

Nifa: For some reason, I get more music videos.

Nishan: We argue a lot over clothes. But when we shop, only one of us needs to try something on.

Nifa: Especially when we're trying on a bikini. The worst thing is looking at yourself in the mirror. I just let Nishan do it.

Nishan: I can ask Nifa her opinion, and she'll tell me the absolute truth.

Ashley & Mary-Kate Olsen

"They were very sweet, real girlie girls," recalls comedian Bob Saget of the eight years he shared Full House with the Olsen sisters, who began splitting the role of daughter Michelle at age 9 months. But the 11-year-old stars of videos, TV specials and albums, who next plan to appear in a televised remake of The Bad Seed, can turn into just that in the closet of their San Fernando Valley, Calif., home. Reports their mortgage-banker-dad, Dave: "When they both want to wear one outfit"—as they did for a recent Spice Girls concert—"all heck breaks loose."

Ashley: A lot of people say we have pretty eyes. Sometimes they're really blue, and sometimes they're green.

Mary-Kate: Yours are very green now, Ashley.

Ashley: When we go to a premiere, someone will do our makeup and hair. We'll use blush and eye shadow for fun. I like to look at Vogue. Mary-Kate, sometimes she just doesn't care. She'll put on jeans and a T-shirt.

Mary-Kate: When we're working, we have to look exactly alike. One time Ashley got her hair cut really short.

Ashley: Too short! I liked it at first, but then I went, whoa!

Mary-Kate: The kids at school never tease us about looking alike. The only thing they tease us about is that we are short. I'm 54 inches. She's 53.

Ashley: Yeah, we're really short. Our brother Trent says it takes two of us to make one person.