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Gwen Stefani
The rocker, a fan of henna tattoos, also adopted a pottu, or forehead dot, because she liked the style of No Doubt's Tony Kanal's Indian mother. Still, says the band's agent, Mitch Okmin, "she takes it off to sleep."

Jerry Seinfeld
Looks can be deceiving. Seinfeld costumer Charmaine Simmons says the comic doesn't get his omnipresent denims pressed: "We sent everything out to a cleaner. They sometimes came back a little steamed."

Madonna
The Material Girl went Ethereal Girl for the Oscars last March and in her recent "Frozen" video. Her sorceress look (here by Versace) was intended to make her "a mystical creature in the desert and the embodiment of female angst," she told MTV in February. Naturally, the shape-shifting singer, who favors styles by Jean Paul Gaultier and Olivier Theyskens, has voyaged beyond gothic. Says her stylist Arianne Phillips: "She's always a step ahead."

Mariah Carey
"She was definitely in the forefront of the trend," asserts stylist Tonjua Twist of the pop star's tube-top tenacity. Carey started wearing tubes in her "Honey" video last summer, Twist says, acquiring them from Halston, Dolce & Gabbana and Gucci. Then, tiring of the shoulder-baring identity, she sought something new. "Now she's into dresses with spaghetti straps—the shorter the better," says Twist. "But they're clean, expensive, upscale. I don't want her looking like a Spice Girl."

Nick Nolte
Like Howard Hughes and Hugh Hefner before him, the actor prefers jammies for those casual Fridays...and every other day (he's wearing Calvin Klein here). He's been seen in pajama bottoms on trendy avenues and in hotel lobbies. "They're light and loose. It's just like wearing sweatpants," explains Nolte's publicist Arnold Robinson. "But if he has to go to a meeting, he'll put on a suit and tie."

Samuel L. Jackson
The busy actor keeps a lid on it almost all the time. Jackson has hundreds of Kangol hats, in almost every hue and style the British company makes. An avid golfer whose father and grandfather also wore Kangols, he mixes and matches caps with his outfits. "He's been wearing them for years," says his stylist, Phillip Bloch. "They really give you some style. And he's got a shaved head, so they're like a wig."

Drew Barrymore
The daisies often spotted in her do speak volumes about Ever After's down-to-earth star, says Gabrielle Zuccaro, owner of Bleu, a hip Hollywood boutique where Barrymore often shops: "It's not something a fancy hairdresser put in her hair. It's just Drew putting a real flower in her hair because it's a sweet little offbeat touch."

Kirstie Alley
When the Veronica's Closet star reaches into her own wardrobe, she usually grabs one of her $2,500 cut-velvet dusters. "She's going for drama," says L.A. designer Jane Booke, who makes the coats. "She likes making grand entrances." Dusters are an Alley staple because they're easy to dress up or down and, says Booke, they flatter the actress's "Botticelli body."

Téa Leoni
Rarely seen without a choker made from her grandmother's pearls, the actress persuaded costumer Ruth Myers that the look was also right for her turn as a TV reporter in Deep Impact. "Téa has translucent skin that does well with pearls," notes Myers. "And her beautiful swanlike neck shows them off."

Queen Elizabeth
She's "the only woman in the world," says Hello! royal reporter Judy Wade, "who wears expensive designer clothes that look like they came from a chain store." But there's a method to the mustiness: The Queen's pastel or bright dresses, suits and coats with matching hats, usually from London's Hardy Amies, show up well in crowds and don't shout wealth.

Andy Dick
"I remember shopping at Sears with my mom in 1974," says the News Radio star, who has been wearing his zany, beyond-Tiny Tim outfits for some five years. "I asked her, 'How do you like this?' and she said, 'Well, you're the one who has to wear it. So the question is, do you like it?' " Dick may never set a trend, but his style, he says, "is fun, it's bright, it's happy. There's enough darkness in the world. Let's bring happiness into people's lives."