Luckier than Lucci
Even as All My Children diva Susan Lucci hopes to snag a Daytime Emmy next month (after a whopping 19 nominations), fellow soap star Jonathan Jackson, 36 years her junior, will be gunning for his third trophy as outstanding younger actor in a drama series. "The first Emmy [my family] didn't have a place for it, so it just went on top of the fridge," says Jackson, 16, who plays Luke and Laura's son Lucky on General Hospital. "Now we've got both of them on the mantel on top of the fireplace." Jackson, who recently costarred as Michelle Pfeiffer's oldest son in the drama The Deep End of the Ocean, has so far avoided being mistaken for another similarly monikered TV teen, Dawson's Creek's Joshua Jackson. "That hasn't happened yet," he says. "Actually, people call me Jeremy quite often. Where that comes from, I have no idea."

All's well that ends Welles
Preparing for his latest film, A Walk on the Moon, was hardly a stroll in the park for Liev Schreiber. "I knew I was up against Viggo Mortensen," says Schreiber, 31, of his romantic rival for Diane Lane. "Come on, the guy is easy on the eyes, and he doesn't wear a lot of clothes in this movie. If anyone was to believe that I [might get] the girl, I was going to have to do some work. So I jumped rope, I ran, and I didn't eat." Schreiber will have to pack on the pounds for his next project, the HBO movie RKO 281. "It's about the making of Citizen Kane. I'll play Orson Welles," he reports. "I'm getting that Welles voice going. And I'm eating as much as I possibly can."

Cosmetic alteration
"It's never too late to start your modeling career," says Ally McBeal's Courtney Thorne-Smith, 31, who this month joined the ranks of celebrity pitchsters as the new spokeswoman for Almay cosmetics. "I really would like to think of myself as someone who can go without makeup," she says, "but I'm not comfortable [without it] because I wear it all week and I get used to looking that way. On weekends I hate to be so disappointed."

Touched by an Angel
In Never Been Kissed, Drew Barrymore plays a 25-year-old journalist who goes undercover as a high school geek to write an expose about student life. Surprisingly, the former wild child says that wasn't much of a stretch. "I know what it feels like to be ugly, awkward and hated by kids your age," says Barrymore, 24. "I went through so many years wondering, 'Will I ever be the swan?' " The actress will get to show who's the Farrah-est of them all in a movie version of the 70s TV series Charlie's Angels, which may also star Cameron Diaz and Lauryn Hill. "It's hard to stretch a Charlie's Angels plot over two hours," she admits. "But I do love that episode where the girls infiltrate a Roller Derby."

In like Clint
Actor Clint Howard plays a director in EDtv, the new comedy directed by his older brother Ron Howard. "I wanted that part because I knew it couldn't be cut out," quips Clint, 40, who has appeared in 10 other of his brother's films, including Splash, Cocoon and Apollo 13. "And I thought it would be fun to have the brother of the director playing the director of EDtv." Clint, who is losing his hair, suggested he wear a rug for the movie. "I thought it would be a good opportunity for a perk," he says. "But Ron said, 'Do you think for one second I'd pay to have a hairpiece made so you can wear it in other movies?' Then he called back and said, 'We'll get a hairpiece that will look like a bad plug job.' " But to Clint, a bad plug job was the right fit for his character. "I think it's a nice touch," he says. "It gives people a laugh."