Rachel Entwistle's Family Grieves and Waits

The 500 mourners who crowded into the Church of St. Peter in Plymouth, Mass., on Feb. 1 were transfixed by a tragic sight: a single wooden casket holding the bodies of both Rachel Entwistle and her 9-month-old daughter, Lillian. Noticeably absent was Neil Entwistle—Rachel's husband and Lillian's father. He'd flown to England Jan. 21, a day before the bodies of Rachel, 27, and Lillian were discovered and has since been living at his parents' house in Worksop, England. Middlesex County prosecutors have called Entwistle, 27, a "person of interest," but deny press reports that he's the only one. "We look at the family, husband, whoever is close," says Melissa Sherman, a spokeswoman for the Middlesex County D.A.'s office. Although a murder weapon has yet to be found, police have examined the gun collection of Joseph Matterazzo, Rachel's stepfather, for DNA and other evidence. (He is not considered a suspect.) A death certificate shows Rachel died instantly from a gunshot to the head, while Lillian died several minutes after being shot in the abdomen.

Although pundits in local media outlets claim the investigation is stalled, family spokesman Joe Flaherty says progress is being made. "They've been watching too many episodes of CSI," he says, "where the crime is solved by the end of the day."

Andrea Yates Leaves Prison

When District Judge Belinda Hill set bond for her Feb. 1, Andrea Yates turned first to her lawyer for confirmation, then smiled to her mother, Jutta Karin Kennedy. "She's not the same Andrea today on medication," says Kennedy. "When the tragedy happened, she was so sick." Yates, 41, whose conviction for drowning her children in 2001 was reversed in November, was transferred Feb. 2 from Harris County Jail to Rusk State Hospital, where she will be housed in a psychiatric unit until a second trial begins March 20. Her attorney hopes to reach a plea bargain with prosecutors; a retrial, he believes, will be damaging to Yates, who takes antipsychotic drugs. Ex-husband Rusty Yates agrees. "I think another trial ... could trigger some kind of relapse," he says.