Owen Wilson, Kate Hudson, Matt Dillon, Michael Douglas
BY LEAH ROZEN
COMEDY

Beware of guests bearing moose heads. The temporarily homeless, unemployed Dupree (Wilson) is lugging just such a stuffed trophy when he arrives to stay overnight at the home of newlywed friends (Dillon and Hudson). The moose isn't a housewarming gift; along with clothing and an old Schwinn, it's the sum total of Dupree's possessions and signals that, despite his protestations otherwise, he's settling in.

You, Me and Dupree is a slight, meandering comedy that, much like Dupree on his wobbly bicycle, spins its wheels but doesn't get far. It shifts lurchingly between slapstick, gross-out humor and quieter character comedy, and the pacing drags. What comic zing You has comes from Wilson, whose laid-back, shaggy presence is an asset to any movie. He manages to make the irresponsible, mooching boy-man he plays almost endearing to watch—though you'd bar the door if he tried to visit. (PG-13)

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Edward Burns, Brittany Murphy, John Leguizamo, Jay Mohr, Donal Logue, Matthew Lillard
COMEDY

There is really only a handful of plots out there—but a truly great movie manages to make what seems old and trite new all over again. The Groomsmen doesn't do that. Instead, this tale of five longtime, thirty-something buddies, who spend a long pre-wedding weekend picking over old wounds and sharing confidences, feels woefully been there, done that. It stars Burns (who also wrote and directed) as a newspaperman about to "I do" with his pregnant girlfriend (Murphy). His older brother, cousin and two best boyhood friends gather in a beach town on Long Island, N.Y. They rehash old times, argue and offer revelations (one is gay, another sterile). There's some solid acting here by a generally talented cast, as well as funny moments. But Groomsmen feels like a movie you've seen too many times before, both in the multiplex and on TV, right down to clichéd dialogue such as Murphy's telling a bickersome Burns, "I just want my friend back." (R)

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Wayans, 34, is the youngest sibling in one of Hollywood's funniest families, and in the new comedy Little Man—directed by brother Keenen, 48, and costarring brother Shawn, 35—he plays a diminutive criminal posing as a baby. Why Marlon? "Shawn is better-looking, but my face is a lot more rubbery," Marlon says. "He'd be a baby you'd want to take in, but if someone left me on my doorstep, I'd leave my little ass outside!" He and Shawn grew up "mischievous," says Marlon, but with respect for their elders: "Keenen taught us about movies—he took us to Airplane! I humbly take my hat off to my older brother."

Nikki Reed

The star and cowriter of Thirteen (2003)—who plays another wild child in the new drama Mini's First Time—turned 18 this year. "I've been an adult for so long; it was just another day," she says of her birthday. "I've been living on my own for four years." One perk? "I just got my first credit card!" Offscreen she's more mild than wild: "My friends call me 'the old woman.' I'd rather stay home and watch Sex and the City than go to a stupid party. I think I partied myself out when I was younger."

The Devil Wears Prada: This summer's comedy for adults, thanks to Meryl Streep's wickedly amusing but also surprisingly affecting turn as an imperious editor at a chi-chi fashion magazine who heaps misery upon her new assistant (a radiant Anne Hathaway). (PG-13)

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Time to Leave: A young, gay photographer (Melvil Poupaud), learning he's terminally ill, sets off on a last journey of self-discovery. Putting a poignant spin on a potentially melodramatic plot, director François Ozon (Swimming Pool) has his hero visit with friends, relatives and old flames plus taking on an unexpected new lover. Jeanne Moreau costars. In French, with English subtitles. (Not rated)

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Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest: The thrill is gone the second time around for this special-effects-saturated adventure tale starring returning swashbucklers Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley. It's repetitive and overlong. (PG-13)

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Superman Returns: Enjoyable. The film pays homage to the Man of Steel myth but adds clever tweaks. (PG-13)

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Anyone for calamari? British actor Bill Nighy, 56, gives salty presence to Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest baddie Davy Jones (right). "I got stuck playing a computer-generated character while everybody else got to look fabulous," he jokes. Where you can catch Nighy in the flesh: UNDERWORLD (2003) LOVE ACTUALLY (2003) SHAUN OF THE DEAD (2004) THE CONSTANT GARDENER (2005)