Nanny Returns

by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus |

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REVIEWED BY LISA KAY GREISSINGER

NOVEL

Seven years after The Nanny Diaries skewered the world of child rearing in Manhattan's upper echelons, authors McLaughlin and Kraus (two former nannies themselves) are back with Nanny 2.0. Now married to "Harvard Hottie," Diaries' heroine Nan, who was fired as family X's nanny 12 years before, has returned to Manhattan to start a consulting business—and, just maybe, a family. She's ambivalent about motherhood. "Being responsible for another person's life," she says. "It's not some nostalgic impulse purchase." But when her former charge shows up drunk at her door—with the old nanny-cam tape Nan made urging his parents to step up to the plate—she reengages with the boy she'd seemingly abandoned. Drawn back into the toxic world of the Xs, she helps Grayer, now 16, and his brother Stilton, 7 (naming your boys after cheeses rarely bodes well), as they navigate their parents' divorce and their negligent mother's illness. In the process, not surprisingly, Nan learns she has what it takes to be a mom. As bitingly funny as its predecessor, this Nanny also make serious points about the pitfalls of modern parenting. It does chick lit proud.

The authors' 2002 bestseller

The Overnight Socialite

by Bridie Clark |

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REVIEWED BY CLARISSA CRUZ

NOVEL

My Fair Lady gets another update in this novel about Lucy, a chubby Minnesotan and wannabe fashion designer who becomes the laughingstock of Manhattan when she crashes through a plastic runway at a glitterati-filled event. Enter Wyatt, a rich, hot playboy who's just dumped his socialite girlfriend Cornelia. Bored with his life, he takes on Lucy as a project. Can he—with the help of a personal trainer and a Bergdorf's card—make her the toast of N.Y.C. society? Of course. Do they fall for each other? What do you think? But Clark's wry observations on the cutthroat New York social scene help redeem her story's predictability.

>PICTURE BOOKS

RED TED AND THE LOST THINGS

by Michael Rosen

Charmingly old-fashioned illustrations enliven this tale of a missing bear with street smarts. (4-8)

ALL THE WORLD

by Liz Garton Scanlon

A family of four, a long and lazy summer's day, infinite possibilities. Mesmerizing in its simplicity. (4-8)

TALES FROM OUTER SUBURBIA

by Shaun Tan

Dreamlike illustrated stories about the suburbs as you've never known them. (Gr. 4 up)

>• Buy a book, do some good: The authors of each of these books are donating part of their proceeds to charity.

MOMMY'S LIGHT IN THE KITCHEN

by Jeannine Ginsburg, Martha Rappaport, Cathy Vogt, Kathy Einthoven

Diagnosed with terminal breast cancer, Jeannine Ginsburg collected her family's favorite recipes (plus more from friends) into a keepsake cookbook. (Available at mommyslight.org)

GIVE A LITTLE

by Wendy Smith

Ten dollars can fight malaria; $50 can save a malnourished child. In addition to showing how your pennies can make a difference, Smith is donating part of her book's proceeds to the 47 charities profiled in the book.

29 GIFTS

by Cami Walker

Giving a gift a day for 29 days didn't cure her MS, but Walker found it did help her feel better about her illness. Her book—and her Web site, 29gifts.org—urges everyone to try it. Partial proceeds to National MS Society and others.

>• "I don't know what I would do if I had to work for a living," writes Harry Benson, whose new book includes highlights from his six decades in photojournalism.

>PICTURE BOOKS

RED TED AND THE LOST THINGS

by Michael Rosen

Charmingly old-fashioned illustrations enliven this tale of a missing bear with street smarts. (4-8)

ALL THE WORLD

by Liz Garton Scanlon

A family of four, a long and lazy summer's day, infinite possibilities. Mesmerizing in its simplicity. (4-8)

TALES FROM OUTER SUBURBIA

by Shaun Tan

Dreamlike illustrated stories about the suburbs as you've never known them. (Gr. 4 up)

>• Buy a book, do some good: The authors of each of these books are donating part of their proceeds to charity.

MOMMY'S LIGHT IN THE KITCHEN

by Jeannine Ginsburg, Martha Rappaport, Cathy Vogt, Kathy Einthoven

Diagnosed with terminal breast cancer, Jeannine Ginsburg collected her family's favorite recipes (plus more from friends) into a keepsake cookbook. (Available at mommyslight.org)

GIVE A LITTLE

by Wendy Smith

Ten dollars can fight malaria; $50 can save a malnourished child. In addition to showing how your pennies can make a difference, Smith is donating part of her book's proceeds to the 47 charities profiled in the book.

29 GIFTS

by Cami Walker

Giving a gift a day for 29 days didn't cure her MS, but Walker found it did help her feel better about her illness. Her book—and her Web site, 29gifts.org—urges everyone to try it. Partial proceeds to National MS Society and others.

>• "I don't know what I would do if I had to work for a living," writes Harry Benson, whose new book includes highlights from his six decades in photojournalism.