From PEOPLE Magazine Click to enlarge
Got a nose job

Jen Selter

HAD SURGERY AT 15

SHE ENDURED INTERNET BULLYING ABOUT HER 'HUGE' NOSE

Jen Selter had always been self-conscious about her nose. For years she wouldn't leave the house without strategically applying bronzer "to make my nose look more narrow," she says, and at Roslyn High School in Roslyn Heights, N.Y., she had taken to wearing padded bras and stomach-baring tops to draw attention away from her face. But after her fellow teens began posting nasty comments on her Facebook page-"She's pretty, but her nose is huge" and "You look like a pelican"-Selter decided she was ready for a change. After visits with a therapist to determine "I was emotionally ready," says Selter, now 16, she had New York City surgeon Sam Rizk tweak her nose last summer. "I'm more comfortable with myself now, happier and confident," she says. "And I have so many more pictures of myself on Facebook!"

Had his ears pinned back

Jon Escalante

HAD SURGERY AT 17

HE HID HIS 'DUMBO' EARS BEHIND HIS HAIR AND THEN LEARNED HE'D HAVE TO CUT IT TO PURSUE HIS DREAM CAREER

In elementary school Jon Escalante was uncomfortable hanging out in the hallways when kids called out, "What's up, Dumbo?" he says. "I'd just turn away because I didn't want to get into a fight." Then in sixth grade, Escalante came up with another way to avoid trouble: He grew out his hair until it was "curly and puffy," he says, and would have kept it that way forever if he didn't want to join a fire-service youth program, for which short hair was a prerequisite. "I was like, 'I can't cut my hair,'" recalls the Sun Valley, Calif., native, who realized the way he felt about his ears was having a detrimental effect on his life. With the support of his mother, Escalante began looking into surgery, and in August 2008 he underwent an otoplasty with Beverly Hills surgeon Gabriel Chiu. Now 19 and a student at Los Angeles Valley College, where he is pursuing a fire-science degree, Escalante says, "I waited all my life to get surgery, and now I don't care if people see my ears!"

Reduced her breasts from DDD to D

Hannah Olson

HAD SURGERY AT 19

HER BREAST REDUCTION TOOK AWAY BOTH PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL PAIN

As a high school freshman at Powell High School in Powell, Wyo., Hannah Olson was "one of the top varsity runners," she says. Then her breasts developed, and by the time she started her junior year, Olson was ranked last on her running team and in near-constant pain from the weight of her 36DDD chest, which took up to three bras to support. "My lower back hurt so bad I couldn't sleep," says Olson. Even worse, male classmates subjected her to "horrifying" name-calling, including "HannahBoob," she recalls. "It was so degrading to me that my bra size was what I was known for." Unwilling to give up the activities-including dance and horseback riding-that she loved, Olson signed up last year with Billings, Mont., surgeon Alan Muskett to take her breasts down to a 34D. "As soon as I woke up, I could breathe easier," says Olson, now 20 and a high school dance coach. Back to enjoying long runs, Olson is experiencing new pleasures as well. "I bought six bathing suits last summer," she says. "It's nice not to have to cover myself up anymore."