LEGAL MATTERS

On July 20 Jennifer Aniston, 41, was granted a temporary restraining order against a man who, according to authories, traveled cross-country in a delusional attempt to marry the actress. Los Angeles police say that Jason Peyton, 24, spent eight days last month trying to locate the former Friends star. When taken into custody on Sunset Boulevard, Peyton was found to be carrying a sharp object and duct tape. He was ordered to stay 100 yards away from Aniston's home, workplace and vehicles and was placed on involuntary psychiatric hold by police. • Bones star David Boreanaz, 41, was sued for sexual harassment by actress Kristina Hagan, 42, on July 22 in Los Angeles. Hagan's lawsuit says that while she was working as an extra on the crime drama last summer, Boreanaz told her he would be able to help her land a featured role on the show, of which he is an executive producer. The mother of two claims there were then several instances in which the married actor tried to grope and kiss her and sent her sexually explicit text messages and photos. A statement from Boreanaz called the accusations "totally fabricated and absurd." • Also being accused of sexual harassment is Casey Affleck (inset), 34, who was sued for $2 million in L.A. on July 23. Producer Amanda White was working on Affleck's documentary about Joaquin Phoenix when, she says, she was "forced to endure uninvited and unwelcome sexual advances in the workplace." White also claims that after she refused to share a hotel room with the actor-filmmaker, she was denied her $50,000 producer's fee. Affleck's attorney calls the allegations "preposterous" and plans to file cross-claims against White.

MISHAP

Smashing Pumpkins frontman Billy Corgan, 43, briefly lost consciousness and collapsed onstage during a concert in Tampa on July 22. The lead singer and guitarist tumbled onto the drum kit but got back up on his feet almost immediately and resumed playing. Later Corgan tweeted, "That wasn't a stage move or clumsiness, that was me blacking out and wiping out." He added that he had "quite a good bruise and am moving slow."

DEATHS

Veteran journalist Daniel Schorr , 93, a former protege of Edward R. Murrow who ended his career as a commentator on National Public Radio, died in Washington, D.C., on July 23. Schorr was a CBS correspondent for 23 years, during which time he landed on President Nixon's "enemies list" and was later recruited by Ted Turner to work for the newly created CNN.

HAYWARD HEADED FOR SIBERIA

Oil giant BP announced on July 27 that embattled CEO Tony Hayward, 53, will step down from his post in October to become a director of the company's Russian operation. The millionaire geologist became the face of BP's poor handling of the massive Gulf oil spill and alienated federal and local authorities dealing with the catastrophe. The executive also sparked widespread outrage when, shortly after the April 20 Deepwater Horizon explosion that killed 11 workers, he whined that he "would like my life back." Hayward is expected to be replaced by Robert Dudley, an American who grew up in Mississippi and spent summers fishing and swimming in the Gulf.