NON-FICTION

GREAT FALL READS

UPPER CUT

by Carrie White

"If I could get my hair right ..." White sighed as a teen. Well, Hollywood's famed hairdresser got her hair right, but not her head. She filled it with booze and coke while styling stars from Cher to Liz. Tasty gossip. (September)

RIN TIN TIN

by Susan Orlean

An improbably fascinating tale of one of the first canine celebrities, the times that catapulted him to fame, and the legacy that endures. (September)

SERIOUSLY ... I'M KIDDING

by Ellen DeGeneres

She doesn't share deep, dark secrets (unless the colonoscopy story counts), but DeGeneres's amiably oddball riffs on everything from kale to catwalks to Jesus will make fans smile. (October)

DESTINY OF THE REPUBLIC

by Candice Millard

Think you're not interested in James Garfield, our 20th President? Millard's action-packed account of his life and truly strange death should change your mind. (September)

SWEET JUDY BLUE EYES

by Judy Collins

The folksinger who inspired Crosby, Stills & Nash's signature song looks back. Forthright and revealing. (October)

BLUE NIGHTS

by Joan Didion

After memorializing her grief for her husband in The Year of Magical Thinking, Didion makes another foray into sorrow and healing with a searing memoir about losing her only daughter, Quintana Roo Dunne Michael, who died at age 39 in 2005. (November)

NOVELS

WE THE ANIMALS

by Justin Torres

"We wanted more," begins Torres's slim debut. By the end of this tightly wound coming-of-age tale, narrated by the youngest of three Puerto Rican American brothers, readers will too. (September)

FALLING TOGETHER

by Marisa de los Santos

The author of Love Walked In and Belong to Me returns with a satisfying novel about friends rediscovering one another-and confronting unwelcome truths-at their college reunion. (October)

THE MARRIAGE PLOT

by Jeffrey Eugenides

A Jane Austen-loving Brown grad finds herself caught between two potential boyfriends, and neither is exactly Mr. Darcy. A light, engaging love story from the acclaimed author of Middlesex. (October)

THE TASTE OF SALT

by Martha Southgate

Marine biologist Josie's dad is an alcoholic, her brother's in rehab, and she's ambivalent about having kids. Four voices tell this poignant story, making each page ache with a different shade of loneliness. (September)

THE ART OF FIELDING

by Chad Harbach

Yes, it's a baseball story, but Harbach's thoroughly engrossing first novel, about the ripple effects following a star college shortstop's disastrous throw, will win you over even if you don't know a catcher's mitt from a curve ball. (September)

Sealed for decades, Jacqueline Kennedy's revealing 1964 interviews with historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr. are now available in a book and accompanying CDs. Among the highlights:

WOMAN BEHIND THE MAN

Jackie saw her role as "making it always a climate of affection and comfort and detente when [Jack] came home ... good food and the children in good moods."

KEEPING THE PEACE

If there was marital discord, "I'd rush and say ... 'I'm so sorry.' He loved that, because it's hard for men to make up first."

TOUGH CRITIC

After Jackie heard talk that Martin Luther King Jr. had once arranged for an orgy and had "made fun of Cardinal Cushing" at JFK's funeral, she said, "I just can't see a picture without thinking, you know, that man's terrible."

THOUGHTS ON LBJ

JFK told Jackie, "Oh God, can you ever imagine what would happen to the country if Lyndon were President?"

MORNINGS AT THE WHITE HOUSE

The kids would play and watch TV while JFK read briefings in his underwear. "There was this awful exercise man, Jack LaLanne, and he'd be telling John and Caroline to do whatever they were doing ... [Jack] loved those children tumbling around."

BEDTIME STORIES

The President liked inventing them, but one day he asked Jackie to buy him some books, saying, "I'm running out of children's stories. I just told Caroline how she and I shot down three Jap fighter planes!"

THE FEMALE VOTE

Jackie thought women who preferred JFK's onetime rival Adlai Stevenson were "scared of sex ... these sort of twisted poor little women whose lives hadn't worked out.... Jack made them nervous."

HAPPY TOGETHER

She worried about the White House fishbowl, but "it was really the happiest time of my life."