Iron Man 3

Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow, Ben Kingsley, Guy Pearce | PG-13 |

bgwhite bgwhite   



SCI-FI

It's hard to know how battling a giant alien millipede might affect a guy, but it seems to have turned Tony Stark (Downey) into Bruce Wayne. This post-Avengers Iron Man is a brooding insomniac, tinkering in his Batcave and so mired in existential angst that he's having panic attacks. He's so dour, it's actually a relief when a madman attacks his Malibu manse, blowing it off the map in one of the film's most spectacular scenes. At least then we don't have to spend the entire threequel in Tony's head.

The evil genius to thank for that is a terrorist known as the Mandarin (Kingsley, superb in a tricky role), and his partner in horrific crimes is Aldrich Killian (Pearce), a scientist still peeved at Tony for a long-ago snub. Their assault sends Tony into exile, essentially stripping the iron from the man.

Only the film can't help tossing in a fourth-season TV-sitcom cliché: a cute kid (Ty Simpkins), who finds supplies and gives Tony someone to talk to during his sabbatical. The only reason these scenes work is because Tony is hilariously heartless with the poor boy, never giving a sentimental inch. That's about the most fun viewers can expect from Iron Man 3, even with bigger explosions, more souped-up suits and crazier stunts. That said, if you're a fan, see it—just be sure to leave your Avengers-size expectations at home.

The Big Wedding

Diane Keaton, Robert De Niro, Susan Sarandon | R |

bgwhite    



COMEDY

Wedding brings Keaton and De Niro together as exes toasting the nuptials of their "adopted son" (they make a point of referring to him that way), while Sarandon plays De Niro's live-in love, pushed aside when the groom reveals that he never told his Colombian birth mother that his parents are divorced. These crass creatures do nothing but lie, cheat and torture each other, but their real crime is that they're not funny. They do have one redeeming quality, though: They're gone in a brisk 90 minutes. RSVP no.

COMMENTS? WRITE TO ALYNDA: alyndasreviews@peoplemag.com

PENN BADGLEY

Is that really you singing and playing guitar in Greetings from Tim Buckley?

It's all me! I even sang live while shooting. Music has always been my first passion. I was 14 when I first learned the guitar.

Is it true you once recorded a pop single?

It's true [sighs]. I was 11, and it seemed like a good idea. I won't say the name of the song because it's too embarrassing. The word "baby" was used a lot in the song, and it sounded like soft-porn music, actually.

Have you ever used your musical talents to woo a girl?

Yes, but only in a meaningful way. I've written a song for every girl that I've been with. That's one of the ways I like to express my feelings toward someone.

Does your girlfriend Zoë Kravitz like your voice?

She loves it. She sings beautifully too. It's wonderful to be able to sing with someone you love.

THE ICEMAN

Michael Shannon chills as real-life hit man Richard Kuklinski, while Winona Ryder shines as his clueless wife. Biggest surprise: The Avengers' Chris Evans as Kuklinski's scarily efficient colleague.

bgwhite bgwhite bgwhite  



ARTHUR NEWMAN

Neither Arthur (Colin Firth) nor Mike (Emily Blunt) like their lives, so the strangers strike out together for new ones. It's a love story, but one under a wet blanket of melancholy.

bgwhite bgwhite   



THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST

Kate Hudson costars, but see this tale of a Pakistani who struggles in New York after 9/11 for lead Riz Ahmed. He's a rare talent.

bgwhite bgwhite bgwhite