The Apprentice: Who Will Win?

The Apprentice: Who Will Win?
Tana Goertz (left) and Kendra Todd go head-to-head to win a $250,000 gig as Donald Trump's new Apprentice.
Craig Blankenhorn/NBC

05/19/2005 AT 06:00 AM EDT

It's the final battle between Book Smarts and Street Smarts as Kendra Todd and Tana Goertz plead their case in the live finale of NBC's The Apprentice tonight. Will Donald Trump pick Todd, a 27-year-old real-estate broker from Boynton Beach, Fla., or Goertz, a 37-year-old sales executive and mom from Des Moines? Here's how PEOPLE's reality-show expert breaks down their boardroom chances.

The Players

KENDRA TODD:
Employee relations: Kendra successfully delegated tasks to her "scatterbrained" crew of Danny, Erin and Michael. And she showed infinite patience while Danny regaled sponsors with one of his corny songs during a meeting at the Best Buy Video Game World Championship.

Kendra also showed she could trust her employees (maybe to a fault: leaving "loose cannon" Danny alone in a room with her sponsors was a mistake). Later, she engaged in a group hug and praised her team to Donald Trump, George and Carolyn. Her fair-play strategy could work to her advantage.

On-the-job stress: Though she's had a tendency to micromanage when she's been project manager and had several run-ins with now-ousted Apprentice wannabe Craig, she's proved she can power ahead despite obstacles from her coworkers

Work-life balance: Young and ambitious, Kendra seems willing to forego her personal life to succeed as a member of the Trump organization. She also pointed out to Trump that she scored a victory all three times at bat as a project manager, a fact that wasn't lost on the winning-obsessed mogul.

Odds: 4-5 (according to oddsmaker Johnny Avello of Bally's Race & Sports Book in Las Vegas)

TANA GOERTZ:
Employee relations: Being in charge didn't suit Tana well. During the exhibition to bring the 2012 Summer Olympics to New York, she called Brian, Kristen and Chris the "three idiots" behind their backs, gave minimal directions and passed the blame when things went awry (like failing to double-check that Gov. George Pataki had an American flag to hold). In the boardroom, she highlighted her own accomplishments and disparaged her team.

On-the-job stress: Tana can keep a smile on her face and adapt to situations: The mom from middle America even pulled off playing a hip VJ on the FUSE music network for a live celebrity charity auction. But appearances can be deceiving – unlike Kendra, she still chooses to dismiss problems instead of resolve them.

Work-life balance: Tana admits that she doesn't "need" a job with Trump as much as Kendra, especially since her family is in Des Moines. However, she's not intimidated by the tough New York City business world: "I'm a shark, but I'm in a goldfish costume," she told Trump.

Odds: Even

Who Should Win?

Kendra has success on her side: Her team pleased the event's sponsors – plus, her loyalty to her employees may give her extra points in Trump's eyes. Meanwhile, Tana and her group made obvious gaffes in their task and underwhelmed the sponsors. Her backstabbing comments could also bring into question her fitness as a leader.

Advantage: Kendra.

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