Divorce No. 7 for Producer Robert Evans

Divorce No. 7 for Producer Robert Evans
Evans and White O'Gara
Roger Karnbad/Celebrity Photo

06/20/2006 09:35AM

Famed Hollywood producer Robert Evans, 75, has reached the end of another happily ever after.

His seventh wife, Victoria White O'Gara, is seeking to end their marriage after less than a year, citing irreconcilable differences in documents filed June 16 at Los Angeles Superior Court.

Evans, a former actor and subject of the 2002 documentary The Kid Stays in the Picture (based on his memoir of the same name), headed Paramount Pictures from 1966-74. His film slate there included such landmarks as Rosemary's Baby, Love Story and The Godfather.

Later, as an independent producer, he was responsible for movies including Chinatown and The Cotton Club.

Evans met White O'Gara, a 43-year-old socialite and former model, in November 2004 at a screening for the 30th anniversary of Chinatown. The wed in Cabo San Lucas the following August.

That month, Evans told Time of his new bride: "She's the only girl I've ever married who's not an actress or an aspiring actress, and you have no idea what a pleasure that is."

He was previously married to actress Sharon Hugueny (from 1961-62), actress Camilla Sparv (1963-65), actress Ali McGraw (1969-72), former Miss America Phyllis George (1977-78) and former Versace model Leslie Ann Woodward (2002-04). Those unions all ended in divorce, and Evans's nine-day 1998 marriage to actress Catherine Oxenberg was annulled.

White O'Gara had been wed twice before Evans, first to the late British industrialist Lord Gordon White, who was 40 years her senior and worth an estimated $400 million. They were married for three years before he died in 1995. Eighteen months later, she wed California Rolls-Royce dealer Tom O'Gara, whom she divorced after six years.

White O'Gara has asked for a repeal of the court's ability to award Evans spousal support.

Perhaps she should have seen the writing on the wall early on: Evans proposed to her with a framed black-and-white photo of her and Sir White, with Evans's face pasted on White's body.

That way, Evans explained to Time, she could "have us both at her bedside at night."

Share this story:

Your reaction:

advertisement

From Our Partners

From Our Partners