Star Tracks

updated 04/20/1981 at 01:00 AM EST

originally published 04/20/1981 01:00AM

Alone together
Ordinarily Christina Onassis, 30, and latest beau Nicky Mavroleon, 21, the son of London shipping millionaire Manuel Mavroleon, keep their distance in public to foil paparazzi. But the aloof twosome's composure was briefly shattered when, arriving at Paris' Charles de Gaulle Airport, they learned of the attempt on President Reagan's life and rushed together. Recovering, they exited in different cars—but ended up in the same place, Christina's residence at 88 Avenue Foch.

Chaka and Diz
In the '40s Dizzy Gillespie's A Night in Tunisia helped introduce bop to jazz. Now the 63-year-old Diz is duplicating that revolutionary sound—he's teaming with steamy songstress Chaka Khan on her Whatcha Gonna Do for Me? album, to be released this month. Updated lyrics to Tunisia were written by producer Arif Mardin and Khan as a tribute to jazz innovators of an earlier time. Working with Diz in a Manhattan studio, Chaka, 28, marveled, "He's such a great dude."

'For Ellen—Bucky'
In the foreword to his 20th book, Critical Path, about man's survival, R. Buckminster Fuller puts in a good word for awareness of "otherness." But at a New York publication party, the scientist-philosopher, 85, at first took no notice of a notable "other," actress Ellen (Resurrection) Burstyn, 48. A friend and fan, Burstyn waited patiently, then got Bucky to sign her copy. She hopes one day to portray his great-aunt, writer-feminist Margaret Fuller.

Ted's not the walrus
Ted Nugent, a/k/a the Motor City Madman, has traded in his loincloth for blue jeans, but the old guitar-whomper still hears the call of the wild every now and again. After taping a segment of comedian Robert Klein's syndicated FM radio show, Nugent gave a leg up to the walrus mascot of Hartford, Conn.'s WHCN, matching the sneakered mammal tusk, fang and claw Klein's turn with Nugent featured cuts from Ted's latest album, Intensities in 10 Cities.

Fit to be Di-ed
The real Lady Diana is a bit on the shy side, but these pretenders were anything but as they welcomed Prince Charles to Lower Hutt, New Zealand. The appearance of the Lady Di look-alikes was a gag cooked up by the prince's traveling circus of Fleet Street photographers, and made possible by the fact that since the royal troth was plighted, the sun never sets on the future queen's hairdo.

Grooms with a view
Conceptual artist Red Grooms, known for the big three-dimensional constructions he calls "environments," was thinking smaller for his current show at Manhattan's Marlborough Gallery. Snapped up at the opening for an undisclosed sum was Grooms' Million-Dollar Flag, a parodic tribute to Jasper Johns and his 1958 painting Three Flags, which sold for $1 million last October.

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