Picks and Pans Review: Friday the 13th—a New Beginning

updated 04/15/1985 AT 01:00 AM EST

originally published 04/15/1985 AT 01:00 AM EST

Let's face it: Nobody interested in this kind of movie wants to know how intelligent the dialogue is or how carefully the director blocks out his scenes or how well the actors are able to articulate their emotions. What you want to know is, do lots of people get chopped up? The answer is yes—lots and lots of people get chopped up. They also get stabbed, skewered, impaled and slit. This is not a movie for fans of blunt instruments. Those who remember the end of Friday the 13th—The Final Chapter, in which Jason, the hockey-masked killer, got himself cleavered right in the noggin, may well wonder how the series could plausibly be continued. In the Hollywood slash-and-cash genre, though, where there's a till there's a way, and the Friday series has turned out to be money in the bank. Danny Steinman directed this sequel with occasional flashes of humor. John Shepard, in his film debut, plays the grown-up version of the boy who put Jason away in The Final Chapter, and Richard (The Ice Pirates) Young portrays the therapist who is treating Shepard, perhaps for the trauma associated with having done away with such a popular monster. They're all incidental to the gallons of artificial blood that flow all over the place, of course. Those who like a sense of continuity in their lives will be gratified to know that the ending apparently leaves open the depressing possibility of a Part VI. (R)

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