Picks and Pans Review: The Young and the Restless

UPDATED 06/17/1985 at 01:00 AM EDT Originally published 06/17/1985 at 01:00 AM EDT

CBS (12:30 p.m. ET)

Many of the one-hour soaps have two makeup people. This one has five, which suggests the producers don't mind at all that beauty is only skin-deep. Maybe they should consider changing the title. The characters are "young" to be sure, but "restless" seems too tame. How about randy? When the nubile lasses and handsome hunks of the fictional Genoa City aren't having sex, they seem preoccupied with talking or dreaming about it. This is the kind of soap that gets criticized because the grandmothers are cute. But it's not all bouffant hairdos and glistening muscles. The show kicks in with outlandish plots, like Tyrone (handsome Phil Morris), a black law student who goes undercover—as a white man—to challenge a mob boss whose daughter meanwhile is interested in his white alter ego, Robert. Watermelon Man visits The Godfather. Who thinks this stuff up? They deserve a raise. It's great. And Melody Thomas as Nikki and Terry Lester as Jack play musical beds better than anyone on TV. They ooze sex appeal. Unfortunately Lester is leaving. The show is crammed with good-lookers, many of whom are also good actors: Stephanie E. (Amy) Williams, Steven (Andy) Ford, Eileen (Ashley) Davidson, Grant (Shawn) Cramer, Tracey (Lauren) Bregman, Doug (Paul) Davidson and Beth (Traci) Maitland, to name a few. The Young and the Restless is not always a brainteaser, but it's always an eye pleaser.

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