Mail

updated 12/26/1994 AT 01:00 AM EST

originally published 12/26/1994 AT 01:00 AM EST

In general, correspondents seem happy that Kelsey Grammer is happy with his new love, Tammi Baliszewski (PEOPLE, Dec. 5), unconcerned by suggestions that fitness guru Susan Powter was never quite as unfit as she has claimed, and both provoked and bemused by the debate over the fate of Spike, the 18-pound lobster now confined to a tank in a Pacific Palisades, Calif., restaurant.

KELSEY GRAMMER
Who can blame Kelsey Grammer for the years of trouble after the years of heartache he has lived with? He is very talented and appears to be kind-hearted, even while carrying a lot of weight on his shoulders. I'm glad he's in therapy and has found someone like Tammi Baliszewski who accepts him for what he is.
CINDY ROBERTS
Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

SUSAN POWTER
Susan Powter's brother says her "fat" photo was taken while she was pregnant. Susan's neighbor says Susan never weighed more than 200 pounds. Who cares! There are people out there who may have better bodies than Susan, but no one can beat her enthusiasm and self-confidence. She is a role model for anyone who isn't happy with the way they look or feel and want to get off their butts and do something about it.
BRIGETTE KRUPITZER, Toledo, Ohio

To the naysayers: Most of us frankly do not give a damn if Susan weighed 160 or 240. Her program gives hope, makes sense and works.
CLAUDIA MEYER, Wichita, Kans.

Hooray for people like Susan Powter, who gave me my life back without having me spend a small fortune to obtain it.
CLARE P. CARTER, Mineral City, Ohio

DAVID CROSBY
How nice for David Crosby to have no problems procuring not one but two donated livers. It must be great to be rich and famous and know that you can destroy your liver through 20 years of drug and alcohol abuse and replace it as easily as you would a car tire. Tell me again that we don't need health-care reform.
ERIN FLANAGAN, Petaluma, Calif.

LUCY GREALY
Your article about Lucy Grealy's struggle to come to terms with her disfigurement was long overdue. Society, unfortunately, creates images of the ideal female (and male), and those of us who do not fit the mold are made to feel inadequate. It was heartwarming to read about a woman who has challenged these stereotypes and has emerged triumphant.
KELLEY DENSHAM, Milwaukee
kelleyd463@aol.com

SPIKE THE LOBSTER
Although I may occasionally agree with Rush Limbaugh's conservative politics, he has repeatedly shown himself to be a sadist concerning animals. Mary Tyler Moore and PETA are absolutely right. It is supreme arrogance to presume that lobsters cannot experience pain, suffering or misery. When in doubt about what any animal may or may not feel, always opt for compassion and you will be on the side of the gods.
ANTIGONE LANKIN STALLINGS
Brewster, Mass.
72500.3562@CompuServe.com

Being a lobster fisherman from Maine, I am writing to inform readers that catching a lobster the size of
Spike is illegal in this state. State law prohibits removal of lobsters with shells larger than five inches. This one must be Canadian. As for Rush Limbaugh, he should save his money. Believe me, Spike would be too tough to eat.
ERIC TWEEDIE, Spruce Head, Maine

It's a cryin' shame that Spike can't have the upper claw and throw Rush Limbaugh's big ol' fat butt in some boiling salt water.
L. DILL, Napa, Calif.

CRIMINAL INJUSTICE
Thank you for your article on people who have been wrongly imprisoned. Rabid politicians tell us we must embrace the death penalty. "Criminal Injustice" tells us why we cannot. We are a people who become absolutely convinced of the "facts" until we find out absolutely otherwise. But the electric chair doesn't work in reverse.
GERRY CORNEZ, New York City

MAIL
We regret the misunderstanding of reader Linda Jarrett, There is a common misconception about "privileged Hollywood marriages." The truth is, like women in most failed marriages, we were wives and mothers who worked. The primary goal of L.A.D.I.E.S. is to reach the millions of divorced and widowed women (and men) who have no idea where to turn in order to move forward and lead productive lives. The outreach we do risks ridicule, but if we direct one person to stabilization, skills training and a promise that the pain does pass, then it is more than worth it.
JACKIE JOSEPH, President
L.A.D.I.E.S. (Life After Divorce Is Eventually Sane), Burbank, Calif.

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