The Insider

updated 01/18/1993 AT 01:00 AM EST

originally published 01/18/1993 AT 01:00 AM EST

HELPING HAND

What would you do if your family had earned $113 million in the last 14 months? Try to do it again, right? A Paramount spokesman says its sequel to 1991's The Addams Family is ready to roll early next month and that Anjelica Huston, Raul Julia and Christopher Lloyd, the principals of the original box office monster, have all been "locked in."

The new movie, which the studio hopes to release at Thanksgiving, adds the character of a "baby-sitter from hell." The part was offered to Kathleen Turner, who mulled over the career value of cleaning up after Pugsley and Wednesday, and then turned it down.

INFREQUENT FLYER?

On Dec. 27, actor James Walters, 23, a costar on Fox's The Heights and the fiancé of Drew Barrymore, boarded United Airlines flight 133 from Boston to Los Angeles with an unidentified older woman.

A source of ours on the plane says the woman instructed the first-class attendants to look after Walters, then stayed in the cabin until just before takeoff. And she managed to remain in the jetway, even peering through the window of the plane's door until the aircraft backed away from the gate. Walters insists the woman was "an overzealous United Airlines rep." Our source, however, was told it was his mother.

MAKING TRACKS FOR D.C.

On Jan. 17, Bill Clinton symbolically retraces the route from Charlottesville, Va., to Washington, D.C., taken by Thomas Jefferson in 1800. (Clinton will complete the 121-mile trip by bus in some three hours; Jefferson, traveling by carriage, needed four days.)

That same day, some FOBs (Friends of Bill) will emulate this century's No. 1 Democrat—Franklin D. Roosevelt—by taking a train down to the nation's capital, as the New York Governor did in 1933 en route to his first Inauguration. The four-car VIP innaugural train chugs out of New York City, and invited guests include Bill Cosby, Richard Gere, Lauren Bacall, Harry Belafonte and Gregory Hines.

THAT GIRL!

Marlo Thomas recently headlined an L.A. revival of John Guare's 1990 play, Six Degrees of Separation. One performance was set aside to benefit the Actors' Fund of America, which helps the entertainment industry's needy. On such nights, the star traditionally appears onstage at intermission or after the final curtain to make an appeal as donations are solicited.

But Thomas didn't. Her spokesperson claims the actress "never said she would come out." Says Actors' Fund general manager Joe Benincasa diplomatically. "We had hoped Marlo would come out. It wasn't such a terrible thing." But sources at the charity pin Thomas's behavior on the fact that some of her celebrity invitees skipped the show, leaving clusters of empty seats in the orchestra—and Marlo "in a snit."

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