Chatter

updated 01/18/1993 AT 01:00 AM EST

originally published 01/18/1993 AT 01:00 AM EST

WHAT, NO FLACK JACKET?
In The Bodyguard, Whitney Houston's publicist was conceived as a middle-aged American but ended up as young Eurotrash. English ex-rocker Gary Kemp, 32, who won the role, found the key at rehearsals: "People thought my lines were scathing. I think the British accent carries some patronizing overtones to Americans. When I saw the effect I had, I just played it up a bit." Nor did the former Spandau Ballet guitarist find it hard to appear supercilious. "I based him on the pseudo lounge-lizard look," says Kemp. "Baggy suits. Leather espadrilles with no socks. Designer Stubble. Always buzzed on diet soft drinks."

WHERE'S THE REST OF HIM?
Since winning a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for GoodFellas 22 months ago, Joe Pesci has cranked out (whew) six more pictures: The Super, JFK, My Cousin Vinny, Lethal Weapon 3, The Public. Eye and Home Alone 2: Lost in New York. He has been so busy assuming new roles, in fact, that the actor, 49, sometimes forgets who he is. "Joe Pesci doesn't exist," he says. "If I see myself on a talk show, I'll say, 'I like that guy. He's honest. Yeah, he's a good actor. Who the hell is he?' "

THE SLUGGER'S WIFE
Halle Berry kicked off 1993 by marrying Atlanta Braves power hitter David Justice on New Year's Day at their Atlanta home (right), then rushing off to finish up two movies (one with Patrick Swayze, the other with, James Caan). "We chose these lifestyles," says Berry, 24, who also has a CBS miniseries, Queen, airing in February. "Somebody's career has got to come first. When I'm not working," she notes, "I travel—I went to the World Series last fall—and he comes with me in his off-season. We don't need to be with each other all the time. That's where the trust factor comes in. We're hoping it's going to be OK."

DOUSE THE LIMELIGHT
Would the Little Tramp be proud that daughter Geraldine Chaplin plays his mother (and her own grandmother) in the new Chaplin bioflick? "He so wanted me to be a lawyer or doctor, engineer or architect," says Geraldine, 48. "He died without realizing his wish to say, 'My daughter's in her fourth year of college,' instead of, 'My daughter's bumming around trying to be an actress.' " Ironically, Chaplin hopes her daughter Oona, 6—named for Geraldine's mother—won't become an actress either: "I fear for those blows to her ego, all those humiliating 'Lift up your skirt, let's look at your legs' experiences."

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