Late Greats

updated 12/25/1989 AT 01:00 AM EST

originally published 12/25/1989 AT 01:00 AM EST

Emperor Hirohito
(1901-1989)
During his 62-year reign, Japan rose in arms, then rose from the ashes to economic supremacy.

Salvador Dali
(1904-1989)
The bug-eyed Spaniard with the coiled mustachio was surrealism's kitschiest exponent.

Irving Berlin
(1888-1989)
"Come on along," he said, and we did, to White Christmas, Easter Parade and God Bless America.

Lucille Ball
(1911-1989)
We love her still in reruns, and her ebullient slapstick made her the greatest comedienne of all time.

Diana Vreeland
(190?-1989)
Hanger-thin, Vogue's editor was fashion's oracle.

A. Bartlett Giamatti
(1938-1989)
A Renaissance Yalie was baseball's eloquent and honorable Commissioner for all seasons.

Robert Penn Warren
(1905-1989)
Our first poet laureate's novels also won hearts and hosannas.

Ayatollah Khomeini
(1900-1989)
He ignited a holy war, then was almost torn apart at his own funeral.

Rebecca Schaeffer
(1967-1989)
A young actress's flame was snuffed by a crazed fan.

George Adamson
(1906-1989)
Fighting to save Africa's wildlife, the co-hero of Born Free lost his own to the guns of poachers.

Mary McCarthy
(1912-1989)
A solitary firebrand, The Group's author ignited intellectual sparks about Vietnam and Watergate.

Amanda Blake
(1929-1989)
Gunsmoke's kindly saloonkeeper Miss Kitty became Hollywood's first noted actress to die of AIDS.

John Cassavetes
(1929-1989)
As an actor in The Dirty Dozen or our main cinema verite director, he made grittiness memorable.

"Rip" Sewell
(1907-1989)
The All-Star pitcher invented the eephus, a cockamamy curve only Ted Williams could clobber.

Gilda Radner
(1946-1989)
Buoyant to the end, the loopy Saturday Night Live comic bowed to cancer with dignity and courage.

Secretariat
(1970-1989)
Still first by a long shot, the Triple Crown winner finished as the greatest racehorse of his time.

Kay Kent
(1964-1989)
Copying Monroe to excess, the British impersonator even duplicated Marilyn's death by pills.

Bette Davis
(1908-1989)
In Dark Victory, All About Eve and on TV, she was one of our grandest—and often baddest—dames.

Laurence Olivier
(1907-1989)
In Hamlet, Othello and Henry V, England's greatest actor stole the show, even from Shakespeare.

Vladimir Horowitz
(1903-1989)
The age's most dazzling pianist performed wizardry on the same keyboard for seven decades.

Guy Williams
(1934-1989)
He left his main mark as Zorro, TV's swashbuckling champion of the poor and downtrodden.

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