Mail

updated 10/27/1997 at 01:00 AM EST

originally published 10/27/1997 01:00AM

JOHN AND PATSY RAMSEY
It's obvious to the rest of the world that the Ramseys are hiding something. Why is it so difficult for the police to nail this case down? I know if I were involved in this case, they'd look at my salary and say, "Arrest her!" Money is the only thing stopping the Ramseys from a similar fate.
SANDY PLENSKI, Levittown, Pa.

Haven't we seen this before? O.J. Simpson still claims to be determined to find "the real killers," and we all know how that's going.
K. SKINNER, Spring, Texas

A little girl sees her pediatrician 27 times between the ages of 3 and 6, complaining several times of vaginal irritation, and the best he can come up with is that it is "perhaps related to the use of bubble bath?" Whom on earth does he think he is fooling?
TINA TRETHOUEN, Stratford, Ont.

My daughter had a yeast infection at age 4, and her pediatrician did in fact state it could be from the use of bubble bath. That was the last bubble bath she had. She is now 9 and has yet to have another infection. Either Patsy Ramsey is unusually stupid in letting her daughter continue to use bubble bath or there is something much more sinister going on.
SUSAN M. KOWALCZYK Sterling Heights, Mich.

The quotes from Patsy Ramsey made my stomach turn. It sounds as if she was living her life through all these pageants, hoping that one day JonBenét would get the brass ring by winning the title of Miss America. I'm sorry, Patsy, your daughter had many talents, but she is not "America's People's Princess."
TAMMY CHRISTENSEN, via e-mail

Can't you let this poor little girl rest in peace? It's bad enough that she was exploited by her parents, possibly sexually assaulted and then brutally murdered. Now you are using her to sell your magazine? If I didn't have a subscription to the magazine, I would have never bought this issue. As a parent, I am offended.
KAREN GINGRICH, Middletown, Pa.

RED SKELTON
I was a child growing up in the '50s, and Red Skelton will remain a lasting memory in my heart. His "unhip" humor is to be treasured in today's world of immoral and crass comedy.
KATHLEEN NEGA, Pittsburgh

The greatest gift my grandmother gave me was when she took me to see Red Skelton. I was only 12, but a very serious child. In that one night, Red touched a part of my heart and taught me how to laugh. I saw him for the last time in 1989 at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. I was 24. I brought him a dozen roses, one for each year since the first time I saw him. His face lit up, and it was nice to have touched his heart for a change. He invited me into his dressing room and we talked for a while. He treated me like a part of his family. I know he'll always be a part of mine.
SHERRY LAYTON, Miami

As a child I had two idols: Carol Burnett and Red Skelton. At Expo '86, in Vancouver, my dream of meeting Red came true. I was working for the Expo Theatre, and Red was there as one of our performers. A kinder, gentler man I have never met. He unfailingly said "Hello" to everyone who was connected with the show. When Expo ended, all of us recalled our worst and best moments, and every single one of us picked Red as our "best" moment. Every single one.
SANDI NIELSEN, Vancouver

I consider myself most fortunate to have traveled and worked with Red Skelton. He taught me many lessons. I must, however, comment on the title of his tribute. The first time he sneezed in my presence, I said, "God bless you, Mr. Skelton," and he quickly replied, "Oh no, Dear Heart, we must never assume that God will bless us, we can only ask that he may." Mr. Skelton closed his shows by saying, "Good night and may God bless."
CATHERINE COTTER, East Troy, Wis.

ALLEGRA BECK
I don't understand why anyone felt it necessary to publicly announce and publish the name and photo of the heir to the Versace fortune. I hope it was not the family that chose to throw this child to the press dogs who will now hound her and scrutinize her every move.
ANONYMOUS

KIRK DOUGLAS
As a future speech language pathologist, I was deeply moved by Kirk Douglas's speech on Oscar night. Too often survivors and their families have to deal with their circumstances alone. Thanks to Mr. Douglas for talking about his difficulties and his triumphs. With all his hard work, I'm sure he'll be using "perspicacity" in a sentence any day now!
KIRSTEN LAGEMAN, Huntington, W.Va.

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