Record-Setting Moments

updated 04/07/2003 AT 01:00 AM EDT

originally published 04/07/2003 AT 01:00 AM EDT

MOST NOMINATED ACTOR
JACK NICHOLSON
After 33 years and wins for 1975's One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest, 1983's Terms of Endearment and 1997's As Good as It Gets, Jaaack came baaack this year with his 12th nod for About Schmidt.

MOST NOMINATED ACTRESS
MERYL STREEP
Her 13th nomination—for Adaptation—put the winner for 1979's Kramer vs. Kramer and 1982's Sophie's Choice ahead of 12-time nominee Katharine Hepburn.

MOST NOMINATIONS AND WINS EVER
WALT DISNEY
With a total of 64 nods and 26 Oscars, Disney said in '54, "It's wonderful, but I think it's my year to retire." To the immeasurable relief of parents, he didn't.

MOST CAFFEINATED POST-VICTORY PERFORMANCE
CUBA GOODING JR.
Ignoring the clock, Jerry Maguire's football hero giddily reprised his end-zone dance moves and "Show me the money!" energy in 1997 during a litany of thanks that stopped just short of his dry cleaner.

ONLY MEN TO BRAVELY GO WHERE NO MEN HAD GONE BEFORE
Up for Best Song in 2000, TREY PARKER and MATT STONE (with composer Marc Shaiman, center) spoofed J.Lo's 2000 Grammy gown and Gwyneth Paltrow's '99 Oscar dress.

ONLY MOVIE WITH ENTIRE CAST UP FOR OSCARS
SLEUTH. MICHAEL CAINE and LAURENCE OLIVIER both lost in '73.

MOST UNINTELLIGIBLE ACCEPTANCE SPEECH
ROBERTO BENIGNI's words after Life Is Beautiful's 1999 win included his wish to "lie down...making love to everybody."

SHORTEST PERFORMANCE TO WIN AN OSCAR
JUDI DENCH
Her eight minutes as Queen Elizabeth I in 1998's Shakespeare in Love were well spent.

ONLY TIE FOR BEST ACTRESS
BARBRA STREISAND shared her first win, for Funny Girl, with The Lion in Winter's KATHARINE HEPBURN in 1969.

FIRST FAMILY WITH THREE GENERATIONS OF WINNERS
THE HUSTONS
Director John and actor dad Walter in '49 for The Treasure of the Sierra Madre; daughter Anjelica in '86 for Prizzi's Honor.

MOST DEJA VU MOMENT
MICHAEL DOUGLAS & CATHERINE ZETA-JONES
The couple arrived for 2001 's festivities looking very 1950, the year Kirk Douglas squired socialite and Zeta-Jones lookalike Eileen Wrightsman.

FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN TO WIN BEST ACTOR
SIDNEY POITIER
Years after his 1964 win for Lilies of the Field, he wrote, "I remember distinctly that my smile froze after a while and I could neither unsmile nor widen it." He was given a New York City parade.

FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN TO WIN BEST ACTRESS
HALLE BERRY
"This moment is so much bigger than me," said a tearful Berry upon her 2002 award for Monster's Ball. "It's for every nameless, faceless woman of color that now has a chance."

FIRST AFRICAN-AMERICAN TO WIN AN OSCAR
HATTIE McDANIEL
Swathed in gardenias in 1940 for "the happiest moment of my life," Gone with the Wind's Mammy got the night's biggest ovation for nabbing Best Supporting Actress over costar Olivia de Havilland.

ONLY PERSON TO WIN AN OSCAR FOR PLAYING AN OSCAR LOSER
MAGGIE SMITH
Her portrayal of a nervous nominee staying at the Beverly Hills Hotel with gay husband Michael Caine earned Smith the real thing for 1978's California Suite.

ONLY ACTOR TO WIN FOR A ONE-WORD ROLE
PATTY DUKE
Having perfected the part of blind and deaf Helen Keller in The Miracle Worker on Broadway, Duke uttered "water" to take home the Best Supporting Actress Award at 16 in 1963.

MOST ORIGINAL USE OF A WOODLAND CREATURE
JENNIFER LOPEZ
Along with the Chanel gown and very nice ice that she wore in 2001, J.Lo batted custom-made false eyelashes crafted from real red-fox fur.

BEST ENTRANCE BY A DRAMA QUEEN
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
A month after a 1961 emergency tracheotomy, the frail winner for Butterfield 8 was ushered down the aisle by husband Eddie Fisher.

THE YOUNGEST AND THE OLDEST

BEST ACTRESS

YOUNGEST
MARLEE MATLIN
1987.
The star of Children of a Lesser God was 21.

OLDEST
JESSICA TANDY
1990.
The theater vet won for Driving Miss Daisy at age 80.

BEST ACTOR

YOUNGEST
RICHARD DREYFUSS
1978.
The brash star of The Goodbye Girl hit it big at 30.

OLDEST
HENRY FONDA
1982.
The On Golden Pond winner was 76; he died five months later.

YOUNGEST PERFORMER TO RECEIVE AN OSCAR
SHIRLEY TEMPLE
A showbiz vet at 6, she starred in three films for Fox in '34 that kept the studio afloat and won her a special pint-size Oscar.

HAPPIEST NIGHT FOR ACADEMY FOOT FETISHISTS
Last year's Oscars, when Mulholland Drive's Laura Elena Harring wore the most expensive awards-show shoes ever: Stuart Weitzman's diamond-encrusted sandals (size 7½) worth $1 million. They went with a 76-carat diamond necklace worth $27 million.

SHORTEST SKIRT
INGER STEVENS
In 1967 the Swedish-born star of that year's A Guide for the Married Man became one of the few on Oscar night to ever willingly follow the perennial instruction to "keep it brief."

ONLY POSTHUMOUS BEST ACTOR
PETER FINCH
After an incendiary performance in Network ("I'm as mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore"), Finch died of a heart attack two months before his '77 win.

LONGEST ACCEPTANCE SPEECH
GREER GARSON
At over five minutes, it led one wag to note of the Best Actress winner for 1942's Mrs. Miniver, "Her speech was longer than her part."

MOST EXISTENTIALLY TROUBLING OPENING NUMBER
ROB LOWE AND SNOW WHITE
Their "Proud Mary" duet made one critic wonder about the '89 ceremony, "Can anyone who lived through it forget such gruesome low points?"

CENSORED
MOST UNDRESSED ATTENDEE
ROBERT OPEL
Ad-libbed host David Niven in '79 of the would-be comic, 33: "The only laugh that man will ever get in his life is by stripping off and showing his shortcomings." Opel was murdered five years later.

MOST FUN TO LOOK AT
CHER
Another year (here, 1973), another glimpse of Cher highlighting another buff body part in another flesh-baring Bob Mackie creation.

ONLY OSCAR TO WIN AN OSCAR
OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN II
The lyricist won Best Song with Jerome Kern in 1942 for "The Last Time I Saw Paris" and with Richard Rodgers in 1946 for "It Might as Well Be Spring."

MOST MISQUOTED ACCEPTANCE SPEECH
SALLY FIELD
What the Places in the Heart winner really said in 1985: "I can't deny the fact that you like me—right now, you like me!"

MOST STRATEGIC ACCEPTANCE
JOAN CRAWFORD
Afraid of losing in '46, she feigned illness and took to her bed, where she accepted her Mildred Pierce award before cameras—fully coiffed and made up.

FIRST ACTOR TO SAY 'NO, THANKS'
GEORGE C. SCOTT
The 1971 Patton winner stayed home, boycotting what he called "a two-hour meat parade...with contrived suspense for economic reasons."

A TOAST TO THE HOST SEEN MOST
BOB HOPE
The legendary wiseacre kept things moving—or tried to—an astonishing 18 times. Billy Crystal is a distant modern-day second with seven.

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