WEEK IN REVIEW: Sunday's 'Sex' Night

06/20/2003 11:00AM

'SEX' KICKER: The sixth -- and final -- season of "Sex and the City" kicks off Sunday, and its effects are starting to sink in among fans and cast members. "When we got back and were shooting our group photo, which we do at the beginning of every year, someone said, 'This is our last group photo,'" actress Kristin Davis, 36, told the Associated Press regarding her publicity shot with costars Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall and Cynthia Nixon. "I had to declare a moratorium: 'We can't talk about it every day. I'm not good with endings!'"

PECK REMEMBERED: Harrison Ford, Calista Flockhart, Michael Jackson, Harry Belafonte, Lauren Bacall, Anjelica Huston, Jimmy Smits and TV producer Norman Lear were among the 3,000 people who attended the public memorial service for Gregory Peck, 87, who died June 12. Actor Brock Peters, 75, a longtime friend and costar in Peck's most famous movie, 1962's "To Kill a Mockingbird," said in his eulogy: "In art there is compassion, in compassion there is humanity and in humanity there is generosity and love. Gregory Peck gave us these attributes in full measure."

STORY REVISED: Despite reports that Pfc. Jessica Lynch's unit, the 507th Maintenance Company, was ambushed outside Nasiriyah after taking wrong turns during the war in Iraq, The Washington Post, in a lengthy probe, revealed that the deadly detour happened because Lynch's division was rerouted -- and her superiors never got the word out. As for Lynch, 20, who was thought to have been shot and or stabbed in the ambush, she was neither, The Post said. Military officials familiar with the Army investigation say Lynch, who was hurt in a vehicle crash, attempted to fire her weapon, but it jammed, and she did not kill any Iraqis.

MEL MUSES: Mel Gibson insists he is not anti-Semitic and that his controversial new film about the last 12 hours of Christ's life is "meant to inspire, not offend," reported Reuters. Gibson's statement broke the actor-filmmaker's silence on his movie "The Passion," which has been the subject of several emotionally charged articles in The New York Times Magazine and elsewhere. "Neither I nor my film are anti-Semitic ... Nor do I hate anybody -- certainly not the Jews. They are my friends and associates," said Gibson, 47.

TONY ENDING: "The Sopranos" will continue for a sixth and (this time for sure) final season, the HBO show's executive producer Brad Grey confirmed to The New York Times. (HBO, like PEOPLE, is part of AOL Time Warner.) The extension will leave the series, which stars James Gandolfini as New Jersey Mob boss Tony Soprano, with a total of 75 episodes, enough for a very lucrative syndication deal.

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