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John Stamos Confessions: 5 Things You Didn't Know | John Stamos

John Stamos: It's 'Exhausting' Playing a Slimy Politician

Originally posted 08/28/2012 11:30AM

John Stamos is having the time of his life in Broadway's The Best Man – but his character, ruthless presidential candidate Joseph Cantwell, is about as far a cry from Uncle Jesse as you can get.

"It's one of the hardest things, to be a bastard for two hours and 40 minutes," Stamos tells PEOPLE. "It's exhausting."

"I'm not used to that as an actor, to make people not like me," he says. "I spent 30 years doing the opposite! But I know that I'm not doing the piece justice or the character justice if I don't lean into making him the snake that he is."

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Spider-Man Gets Cold Shoulder from Tonys

Spider-Man Gets Cold Shoulder from Tonys

Originally posted 05/01/2012 09:40AM

Broadway's biggest night – the 66th annual Tony Awards – may be 40 days away, but the celebrating has already kicked in, especially for a modest new musical called Once, a love story set in Ireland that scored the most nominations of any show this year: 11, including best musical.

Not celebrating: the much-maligned Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, which, despite an expenditure of $70 million, scads of publicity and the music of U2's Bono and the Edge, landed with only two nominations, for costume and scenic design.

Faring better after the nominations were announced Tuesday morning – by a chipper Kristin Chenoweth and a droll star Jim Parsons, who is about to star in a Broadway revival of the comedy Harvey – were such nominees as Andrew Garfield, Cynthia Nixon, Philip Seymour Hoffman, James Earl Jones, Stockard Channing, Linda Lavin, John Lithgow and Frank Langella.

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James Earl Jones Conquers Stuttering

Originally posted 10/08/2002 12:00PM

It's hard to imagine James Earl Jones without his booming Darth Vader voice. But once upon a time, Jones, 71, kept silent because of his tough time pronouncing words -- a problem that he now speaks freely about, even to members of Congress, PEOPLE reports.

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