A Scottish Castle Is Offering You the Chance to Live the Downton Abbey Lifestyle – for Just $4,200 a Day

Downton Abbey: Scottish Castle Lets Visitors Live the Life of the Characters
Exterior of Dundas Castle
Johnathan Smith/Lonely Planet Images/Getty

03/09/2016 AT 04:30 PM EST

You've seen the show, now live the life. 

A Scottish castle that is still inhabited by a titled couple is offering visitors The Downton Experience of living like a lord – or toiling below stairs. 

Surprisingly, tasks including baking, household chores and domestic cleaning have all proved popular, Dundas Castle's general manager, Lucy Scillitoe, told The Times of London.

Scillitoe said she was "surprised" by how many Americans preferred domestic service to deluxe indulgence.



"The downstairs experiences are just as popular as the upstairs," Scillitoe said. "It's something that you wouldn't think would be as attractive."

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"Baking in the private kitchen is particularly popular," she said. "The butler also shows them how he prepares clothes for the owner."

A Scottish Castle Is Offering You the Chance to Live the Downton Abbey Lifestyle – for Just $4,200 a Day| Vacation and Travel, Downton Abbey, The Royals

"Summer Room" at Dundas Castle

Lonely Planet / Getty


"The package features downstairs activities, including learning how to make a bed like a housemaid, cooking with the chef and polishing the shoes or silver," according to a brochure quoted by the newspaper.

Introduced at the end of 2015, the experience costs a mere $4,200 a day.

A Scottish Castle Is Offering You the Chance to Live the Downton Abbey Lifestyle – for Just $4,200 a Day| Vacation and Travel, Downton Abbey, The Royals

Stained-glass window at the entrance to Dundas Castle

Lonely Planet / Getty


Sir Jack Stewart Clark, the castle's owner, credits Downton Abbey with piquing American interest in bygone British country house living.



"Whether it's a personal shooting lesson or a tutorial from the butler, we like to make sure the experience is authentic," Stewart Clark, whose family has lived in the 17-bedroom, 600-year-old castle since the late 19th century, told ABC.

A Dundas Castle employee also tells PEOPLE that "a lot of Americans love Scottish castles. Maybe it's heritage.

"You can bake a cake in the kitchen and then eat in the drawing room, if you like" she said. "It's like you're living in the castle. It's very romantic."
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